Bob Turner

Adding Value

What kind of value is needed to enhance our ability to lead?
How can we add the greatest value to our leadership?
Why does adding value mark the difference in long-term development?

The value needed to enhance our ability to lead involves respect. Value is added to our leadership over time and by demonstrating integrity during critical decisions.

The reason this value marks the difference in long-term development is because respect is elicited as a result of a leader’s abilities and achievements.

Respect is one value that when added to leadership changes the power of our leadership.

A Snapshot of Leadership

A snapshot is an informal photograph taken quickly, typically with a small handheld camera, more recently with our phone. How does this relate to leadership?

Formal moments in our leadership are characterized by the pomp and circumstance of following a predetermined path. We practice what we say to ensure we cross every “t” and dot every “i.”

Informally, we let our guard down. In these moments our true self springs forth and those who see us take a snapshot of who we really are.

These snapshots are the most important to our leadership influence. What kind of snapshot are others taking?

Changing the World

Love, humility, and charity, are qualities that increase a leader’s influence.

Eleanor Roosevelt once said, “A mature person is one who does not think only in absolutes, who is able to be objective even when deeply stirred emotionally, who has learned that there is both good and bad in all people and in all things, and who walks humbly and deals charitably with the circumstances of life, knowing that in this world no one is all knowing and therefore all of us need both love and charity.”

The way leaders approach life can change the world. Mrs. Roosevelt’s thoughts provide a good compass for how we bring about that change.

Counting the Cost

Counting the cost when leading others can be a daunting task.

One of the most pressing thoughts among these questions involves having enough to finish well.

Do we have enough resources to achieve the goal?
Do we have enough staff to implement the plans to achieve the goal?
Do we have enough time to complete the job?

Having enough resources, staff, and time are only three components that require our attention when setting goals, establishing plans, and implementing both to produce growth.

An Invoice

An invoice serves several purposes for both the one writing the invoice and the one receiving it. What is interesting is how the idea of an invoice also factors into areas of leadership.

An invoice communicates information about services rendered and materials purchased.

An invoice serves as a point of reference for both parties and allows future access to all information.

An invoice also represents an agreement, contract, or commitment for each person identified.

If leaders communicate information (vision, goals, plans, etc.) as a point of reference, imagine the impact and commitment it would generate.

Precision

When leadership is characterized by accuracy, decisions and actions specify what must be done.

Leaders who pursue correctness, ensure others that what is being done is “right.”

Exactness demonstrates their leadership is precise.

A meticulous leader distinguishes themselves by paying attention to details.

When we examine our character each day, let us focus on being precise.

Developing precision in our leadership can be as simple as pinpointing what must be done, determining to do it right, exacting preciseness, and paying attention to the details.

The Leadership Line

Everyone has a line, a specific line that influences what we will or will not do. The line may fall into areas that involve our moral, ethical, or legal character.

The line is often adjustable and once moved, an effort to rationalize our decision ensues.

Our task is one of great magnitude and requires an understanding of where to draw the line. Consider the following.

1) God has already established and provided the line.
2) Consistency is critical in the development of godly character.
3) Remember the long-term consequences.

If we think first, where we place the line may make the difference.

Try, Listen, Think, Wait, Forgive

One of my favorite quotes has no known author, ”Before you quit, try. Before you talk, listen. Before you react, think. Before you criticize, wait. Before you move on, forgive.”

These five suggestions are powerful.

Do we quit before we really give it a try?
Do we dominate the conversation without really listening?
Do we react, only to think later that we should have thought it through?
Do we jump to conclusions and criticize others?
Do we move on, but carry a grudge?

More could be said, but when we follow each of these suggestions, our lives and the lives of others will be richer.

Five Minutes A Day

Imagine the difference five minutes a day can make in our leadership.

1) Take one minute to pray about something or someone and notice the change.
2) Before jumping to conclusions, take one minute to think first before reacting.
3) Take one minute to ask for or offer help to someone in need.
4) Spend one minute to write a note of appreciation, make a to-do list, or log daily activities.
5) Practice one minute every day to build up someone’s morale.

Five minutes a day makes a considerable difference for everyone influenced by our leadership.

The Process of Leading

The difficulty that arises in leadership is often connected to learning how to work through any process in order to reach the desired end.

Sadly, learning the process is where the problems begin to surface. The process of one activity or location may not be the same process in another.

The protocol changes depending on the people, culture, and model established.

When we are able to determine the process and work within it, we develop a greater measure of credibility and gain the kind of influence that assists us in becoming the people God intends.