Bob Turner

Intentionality

Intentionality has powerful implications. Words such as deliberate, calculated, planned, studied, and purposeful are all related.

When leadership is intentional, decisions are well thought out before implementation, mistakes are reduced, confidence is displayed, and steps are taken to ensure others follow the right path.

Intentionality does not guarantee the right decision will be made every time, but such an approach builds on the foundation of solid reasons for each decision.

The need for both secular and spiritual leaders to be intentional in their leadership is obvious. The longer intentionality is discarded, the more leadership flounders.

A Season for Leading

We all sense a change in the season.

Changes in the season indicate the value and beauty of variety and the lesson for leadership is important.

Everyone has a preference connected to the style of leadership they like to follow. There is, however, value to recognizing the benefits of a variety. A variety in leadership style can…

  1. Provide different perspectives.
  2. Eliminate limitations for growth.
  3. Encourage creativity among followers.
  4. Increase the opportunity for leadership development.

The message in our leadership does not change, but the style / method by which we approach that message may need a change of season.

Don’t Stop

Ultra-distance runner, Scott Jurek, suggests we must be dedicated to our goal if we hope to stay motivated and prevent the desire to stop.

Dr. Richard Bandler said, “Failure means you’ve stopped. So don’t stop. Keep at it. The more you move in the right direction towards success, the better you’ll feel. Every day work on making new positive habits second nature — make them automatic.”

When we dedicate our life to the Lord and pursue the goal with diligence, we will remember the purpose for which we seek success.

Nothing is more worthy of our time and effort. Don’t stop!

A Destination Worth Reaching

How will we know when we reach the destination? The answer requires considerable thought.

To begin with, “Where are we headed?”

Our destination is based on the priorities that govern our lives, physically or spiritually.

Consider a few tips to guide us in the right direction.

First, remember there is more to life than food, clothing, and housing.
Second, we are easily blinded by only what we know empirically.
Third, time is a commodity we cannot afford to waste on the journey.

A few moments to answer the question based on these three thoughts can save a lifetime of frustration and failure.

The Path of Leadership

All of us walk one path or another. Jesus taught there are only two possibilities. Where do these paths lead?

The narrow path implies challenges that make the path difficult.

The broad path implies a level of ease and no difficulties.

However, we must also consider the end result. Where does the path we walk on lead? The narrow path, even though challenging, leads to eternal life. The broad path, as appealing as it seems with its comfort and ease, leads to eternal destruction.

Leadership increases the responsibility to consider an important question. Where does the path lead for those who follow our leadership?

A Leadership Method

What method is used to improve our understanding of spiritual leadership?

What method will best grow or develop our spiritual focus?

What method will we implement to achieve the goals established for those we lead?

Several years ago, I heard someone say, “Any method will work, if we will work the method.”

Improvement, growth, and implementation are words that indicate work. Something has to be done in order to achieve our goals and the method designed is the means by which it will be accomplished.

Determining the right method is a key component to our leadership.

Lead Like Jesus, Part 2

To lead like Jesus is to love God and others with all of our being. Jesus did not love God or others when it was convenient or suited His personal desires.

In modern terminology, Jesus was “all in.” Nothing stood between Him and serving His Father in ways that demonstrated loyalty and faithfulness.

Jesus was also completely focused on both the physical and spiritual needs of others.

We can learn much in striving to fulfill this one thought, “If you want to lead, lead like Jesus.”

If we truly desire to lead, we need to give more thought to how we lead.

What Identifies Your Leadership?

How do we determine our identity?

There is a difference between the way we judge ourselves and the way others judge us. We judge ourselves by our intentions, but others judge us by our actions.

Thomas Jefferson once said, “Action will delineate and define you.”

Our identity is not so much based on our actions, but the actions of someone else. The actions of Jesus delineate and define us. Because of His actions we learn who we are and what we do.

Thankfully, God’s wisdom preordained an avenue by which we find our identity as His children.

Missional Leaders

Being prepared is foundational to influence. When challenged or questioned, we must be ready.

Peter reminds Christians to always be ready (1 Pe. 3:15). Ask yourself, “Am I ready?

Preparation is connected to a few key principles.

1. Understand the urgency of the situation. Preparation can make the difference.
2. Recognize that answers are found in the Bible. God provided a tool to prepare us. Know it!
3. Ask others for assistance. The wisdom of others can improve who we are and what we do.

Are you ready? A few simple steps will help you get there.

Missional Leaders

In marketing, a company seeks the right angle to motivate people to purchase their product.

Sadly, trillions of dollars are spent globally to learn how to entice consumers to participate in what they do best…consume.

Spiritually, the result leads to what is often called the “attractional” church. The idea is to provide some sort of gimmick in the form of a program or activity that will attract people to “come in” and find Jesus.

However, Jesus provided a different marketing strategy that ensures success. This strategy involves “going out,” what is identified as “missional.”

We need missional leaders today.