Category: saltJournal

Bob’s daily blog of leadership points.

Micro-Managing Leaders

We all know leaders who micro-manage every area. They want a hand in every intricate part of the project or activity.

They tend to experience fear if something happens they do not control.

We need to rethink the approach we take in leading others for the sake of our Lord and Savior.

We plant and water, remembering that He is the One who will make it grow. If we can focus on doing our part, He will do His!

The challenge enters when we think we are responsible for God’s part and micro-manage our influence in leading others. Trust God to do His part.

The Father’s Business

Thinking about the early life of Jesus raises an interesting thought about “taking care of business.” At the age of 12, when Jesus is approached by His mother, He asked her, “Did you not know that I had to be about My Father’s business” (Lk. 2:49 KJV).

Considering the focus of Jesus at this point in His life is a reminder to all of us about the business we need to be focused on…our Father’s business.

When we lead others with this in mind, it changes relationships. Let us always lead others with the Father’s business in mind.

Turning Failure Into Success

When failure happens, it is often debilitating. We struggle to move forward and benefit from the experience.

Failure, however, can lead to success when we realize that it reveals ways not to do something, allowing us to channel our focus, investing our efforts into areas that lead to success.

Approaching failure with this mindset changes how we establish a vision for the future and how we respond to the challenges we face in life.

Spiritual leaders help others through times of failure with a vision of real success. Here we find motivation to conquer the greatest of failures.

Focused on the Future

We all experience difficulties that create discouragement in life.

During these times, we need to remember that God has something better prepared for us.

Reflect on Paul’s reminder, “We look not at the things which are seen, but at the things which are not seen; for the things which are seen are temporal, but the things which are not seen are eternal” (2 Co. 4:18).

Our God is great, worthy of our praise and trust.

“Let us press on toward the goal for the prize of the upward call of God in Christ Jesus” (Phil. 3:14).

Leading With Value

How much value do we place on life? From a leadership perspective, the answer is measured in how our time is spent.

Most are familiar with the expression that “life is not measured in the number of breaths we take, but in the moments that take our breath away.”

If we lose sight of what is most important, we can easily get caught up in what is called the “tyranny of the urgent.”

Take a moment to reflect and remember that every second is a gift from God. Each is valuable and worthy to be used influencing others for the Lord.

Alienation

When someone is isolated from a group they belong to, we tend to identify it as alienation.

Leaders have an opportunity to influence others for the Lord, for the betterment of life, and growth in the kingdom.

When we are driven to prove a point or advance our agenda, we can alienate those we try to influence, and we lose credibility.

When we lose our credibility and influence, two things happen: 1) a wall of defense is erected, and 2) we drive the other person deeper into their convictions.

The cause of Christ is too great to alienate someone from the greater good.

Complexity of Leadership

Life is complicated. Just when we feel like we have a good handle on it, something changes. Even when we have a vision, spend hours setting goals and establishing plans, there seems to always be that one item that throws us a “curve ball.”

Leadership can be tricky. As complicated as life can be, when leading others, the complexities increase.

Providing structure is essential to understanding the nature in which all the components required to achieve our vision are implemented.

This structure keeps everyone focused and active.

The work can be difficult, but when it is accomplished, everyone grows.

Catching Fire

Leaders need to stop looking at the negative, discouraging, and depressing nature of situations, and step up with some enthusiasm that will take action.

Steve Harvey says, “Catch fire today! Make today the day you stop complaining and do something!”

Nothing is more significant to the development of solid leadership than “catching fire.”

Somehow, leaders must present an example of moving away from the individualistic / humanistic philosophy that characterizes so much of our world.

Imagine a world where leaders spent their time focused on developing others to reach their greatest potential.

Now there is a vision worth catching fire to achieve.

May it be so!

Learning From Failure

Is it possible for failure to provide benefit or value when developing leaders?

Winston Churchill is credited with saying “success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.”

No one wants to fail, yet it is necessary to help grow our leadership in ways that benefit the good of God’s kingdom.

While no one desires failure, or looks for it in order to benefit, knowing that failure can and will occur helps prepare us with an expectation that when it happens we can approach it from a posture of learning its value.

A Critical Step

At times, it is extremely difficult to make a decision that involves taking steps in a direction that may go against the grain, challenge tradition, or ruffle someone’s feathers.

When this happens, it is critical to have the confidence of knowing the proper due diligence has been done to ensure the decision is right to direct the future development of the work.

To be critical involves an evaluative and analytical approach to various situations. Leaders who evaluate with a critical eye will analyze the situation in ways that provide possible solutions for overcoming challenges.

The next step should be a critical one.