Category: saltJournal

Bob’s daily blog of leadership points.

Happiness

Whether you are a fan of Andy Rooney or not, his thoughts on happiness are worth reading.

“If you don’t enjoy getting up and working and finishing your work and sitting down to a meal with family or friends, then the chances are you’re not going to be very happy. If someone bases his/her happiness on major events like a great job, huge amounts of money, a flawlessly happy marriage or a trip to Paris, that person isn’t going to be happy much of the time. If, on the other hand, happiness depends on a good breakfast, flowers in the yard, a nap, then we are more likely to live with quite a bit of happiness.”

Think For A Moment

Solomon wrote, “as a man thinks in his heart, so is he” (Pro. 23:7). The way we think has the power to define us and our character.

A New Testament parallel comes from Paul’s letter to the church at Philippi.

Throughout the letter, Paul speaks of standing firm with one mind, being of the same mind, having the mind of Christ, and then he tells us to think on the right things.

And they are…true, honorable, right, pure, lovely, things of good repute, excellence, and anything worthy of praise.

Imagine the attraction to the outside world when the mental focus of Christians is on these areas.

Pursue Your Passion

What leaders pursue is determined by the core values of their character. If their character is biblically based, the pursuit is divinely grounded.

The nature of your pursuits is supported by the passionate and driving force in your life.

At times, the direction may not be what you expect, or the most comfortable, yet it must be pursued.

What gets you up and out the door in the mornings? Are you passionate about and willing to give your life to pursue it, or will you wait until the opportunity passes you by?

Leaders shape the future by their pursuits and so will you.

A Leading Question…Part 2

Why? This word alone penetrates the heart of our motives, actions, attitudes, and decisions. Considering the purpose and direction of our leadership, we need to ask – why?

Why do we seek to influence others for the cause of Christ?

Why are we interested in improving the quality of work produced?

Why would we challenge past procedures and consider change?

Why is it necessary for us to work harder and longer than others?

The answer to these and hundreds of other such questions will guide us to make a difference. Isn’t this the answer to the question – why?

A Leading Question…Part 1

Numerous words convert sentences into questions: what, will, how, when, where, and who? These words validate the importance of questions that determine the information needed to assess and make necessary conclusions.

There is one word, however, that takes a level of preeminence and it is necessary to challenge the core of who we are and what we do as leaders.

Why? Nothing else needs to be added to this word to complete a question.

Children are famous for asking this question regarding every answer given by parental and educational authorities. Why?

As we lead, we must think more about why.

Ambitious Leadership

Every leader needs ambition: a strong desire to do or achieve something, typically requiring determination and hard work.

When Paul wrote to the church at Corinth, he claimed our ambition is to be pleasing to the Lord (2 Co. 5:9).

Imagine the power of leadership when strong desire, determination, and hard work are exerted toward pleasing the Lord.

Ambition based on this purpose will guide every area of life and leadership.

In our homes, on the job, in the community, and within the Lord’s church we show the world we are His disciples when our ambition is to please the Lord.

Leading With Attitude

The attitude of a leader makes the difference.

A negative, self-centered, sadistic, apathetic, and indifferent attitude is destructive. At the same time, a positive, self-less, compassionate, and thoughtful attitude is powerful.

I once heard the question asked, “Is your attitude worth catching?

What can we do to improve our attitude?

1) We need to be careful what we allow into our mind.
2) Develop positive affirmations and write them down.
3) Avoid emotional “vampires” who tend to suck the joy out of any good situation.
4) Set and achieve daily goals.
5) Act like a “maniac.” MaryAnn Troiani says “happy people are maniacs on a mission.”

A Winning Combination

Paul identifies the need for Christians to have the same mind that was in Christ (Phi. 2:5), but what is that mind?
Notice the phrases that characterize the mind Paul wants all Christians to possess.

1) Do nothing from selfishness or empty conceit.
2) With humility regard others as more important than yourself.
3) Do not look out for your own interests.
4) Look out for the interest of others.

These four phrases are summed up in the life of Christ: a selfless humility that puts others above self.
Jesus and others is a winning combination for leadership.

Biblical Resolution…Part 2

Paul’s letter to Philemon regarding the runaway slave, Onesimus, is another great text on resolving conflict. Paul makes several appeals, and each hold significance.

First, he appeals to Philemon’s character, faith, love for the church, and dedication to the Lord.

Second, he appeals for the sake of his self-sacrificing love.

Third, he appeals to the value and worth of Onesimus, not as a slave, but a brother in Christ.

Fourth, he appeals to his own confidence in Philemon to go beyond what Paul asks.

Our conflict with others could be resolved more quickly if we spent a little time making an appeal based on these four areas.

Biblical Resolution…Part 1

The Gospel of Matthew highlights Jesus instructing the disciples in what to do if a brother sins against you. He
said to “go to them in private.” Conflict could be more easily resolved if we took this approach.

Of course, Jesus continues with taking two or three witnesses, if they do not listen to you. However, the most powerful part is found at the end, “if they will not listen to the church.”

Imagine the power of an entire congregation on your doorstep to resolve the conflict.

His point is not about discipline, but about restoration. Let’s seek reconciliation.