Category: saltJournal

Bob’s daily blog of leadership points.

What Identifies Your Leadership?

How do we determine our identity?

There is a difference between the way we judge ourselves and the way others judge us. We judge ourselves by our intentions, but others judge us by our actions.

Thomas Jefferson once said, “Action will delineate and define you.”

Our identity is not so much based on our actions, but the actions of someone else. The actions of Jesus delineate and define us. Because of His actions we learn who we are and what we do.

Thankfully, God’s wisdom preordained an avenue by which we find our identity as His children.

Missional Leaders

Being prepared is foundational to influence. When challenged or questioned, we must be ready.

Peter reminds Christians to always be ready (1 Pe. 3:15). Ask yourself, “Am I ready?

Preparation is connected to a few key principles.

1. Understand the urgency of the situation. Preparation can make the difference.
2. Recognize that answers are found in the Bible. God provided a tool to prepare us. Know it!
3. Ask others for assistance. The wisdom of others can improve who we are and what we do.

Are you ready? A few simple steps will help you get there.

Missional Leaders

In marketing, a company seeks the right angle to motivate people to purchase their product.

Sadly, trillions of dollars are spent globally to learn how to entice consumers to participate in what they do best…consume.

Spiritually, the result leads to what is often called the “attractional” church. The idea is to provide some sort of gimmick in the form of a program or activity that will attract people to “come in” and find Jesus.

However, Jesus provided a different marketing strategy that ensures success. This strategy involves “going out,” what is identified as “missional.”

We need missional leaders today.

A Conveying Leader

Conveyance involves the action of making an idea, feeling, or impression known or understandable to someone.

The bottom line is communication. Leaders must be good communicators. They know the vision, mission, and values that drive the organization.

When the story of God’s mission unfolds in the life of Jesus, the heart of His vision, mission, and values conveys hope with eternal ramifications.

It changed the lives of 3,000 people on the day of Pentecost.
Numerous disciples / apostles suffered and died to see others obey it.
The message has the same power to save two thousand years later.

Let us lead with conveyance.

Refuse to Give Up

Numerous people speak about persistence, perseverance, and the stick-to-itive mindset connected to success.

The ability to never quit, even in the face of challenge, difficulty, or hardship is rare and needed in the home, world, and church.

My oldest son says, “It’s amazing what happens when you REFUSE to give up. Failure eventually gives up on you.”

Of all people, leaders must possess that quality of grit that eliminates the possibility of failure.

Developing a fighting spirit in face of adversity will strengthen our leadership and encourage others to address their own challenges with the same vim and vigor.

Lead Like Jesus

Peter clearly points out that Jesus suffered, leaving an example to follow in His steps.

Peter’s first letter is one that acknowledges the need for Christians to prepare for suffering, not to be surprised when suffering occurs, and to know that when they suffer as Christians they are blessed.

Would we think differently about the words of the song, “Oh To Be Like Thee,” if we knew that we were asking to suffer as Jesus suffered?

We often hear, “Lead like Jesus.” Will our leadership involve suffering for the cause of the Lord? Are we willing to lead like Him?

Don’t Quit

Success and failure are subjective terms. How we define and determine success or failure depends largely on our perspective.

Dr. Richard Bandler helps with this perspective by saying, “Failure means you’ve stopped. So don’t stop. Keep at it. The more you move in the right direction towards success, the better you’ll feel. Every day work on making new positive habits second nature — make them automatic.”

While it is not complicated, leaders will go far by learning that success is based on this simple principle – Don’t Quit!

Leading into Tomorrow

More than a few people struggle with past mistakes. Guilt makes us wish we could return to the past and make corrections, even though we know it is impossible.

The challenge is overcoming the desire to live in the past and not allowing the mistakes of the past to dictate our future.

We must learn from the past and realize that our future is determined by the choices we make today to shape a better tomorrow.

If we make decisions built on a spiritual foundation, the direction of tomorrow is one that ensures a future with eternal significance.

Leadership and Character

I have often discussed the necessity of character when talking about leadership. The primarily quality of a leader’s character is trust.

Leaders must certainly be worthy of the trust placed in them by those who follow.

I appreciate Rory Vaden’s thought, “In easy times, personality is revealed. In hard times, your character is revealed.”

The last year delivered some pretty hard times for leaders in the church. Now, more than ever, the church needs leaders who have the kind of character that is worthy of trust.

Can God trust us to lead in this way?

True Leadership

In a recent podcast, Patrick Lencioni talked about leadership with an interesting twist. He said, “There is no such thing as ‘servant leadership.’ If you are a leader, you are a servant.”

Of course, the idea speaks to many facets of leading. Some serve themselves, and others serve the people they lead.

Rory Vaden coined the thought, “If serving is beneath you, then leadership is beyond you.”

Both of these men speak to the heart of what leadership is all about––serving.

We have the example of Jesus. The question really becomes, “Who will we serve in our leadership?”