Tag: Christ

God’s Workmanship

In his letter to the church at Ephesus, Paul paints a beautiful picture of what God creates in Christ Jesus, described as “His workmanship.”

The root form of this word means “to make happen.” God is instrumental in making a new creation happen through Christ Jesus (cf. 2 Co. 5:17).

The idea further indicates the purpose for which we have been made His workmanship: to make good works happen that were previously prepared by God.

An application to leadership seems obvious. God has given leaders an opportunity to lead in the greatest work on earth, the workmanship of God to make His will happen.

A Patient Leader

Biblical patience has an object, not patience for the purpose of patience, but for the sake of another.

The obstacles to patience include segmenting, regulating, and hoarding time, as well as, exalting productivity and the desire for speed.

Patience can be cultivated by remembering our relationship with God, including God’s patience with us in those times we were stumbling through life trying to determine our place in God’s redemptive story.

We also cultivate patience by thinking of time differently––as a gift instead of a commodity.

Demonstrating patience helps support the strength of leadership as others are led to see the working of God through Christ in their lives.

Serving Others

Lewis Carroll claims that “one of the secrets of life is that all that is really worth the doing is what we do for others.”

The approach to life in determining what is in the best interest of someone else must drive our leadership.

Biblically, this idea becomes a common thread throughout many of the individual books written to God’s people.

The mind of Christ involves a humble spirit that seeks to do nothing from selfishness or empty conceit, but one that regards others as more important than self (Phil. 2:3-5).

This is the heart of leadership. May we always strive to serve.

Peace

Kimberly Jones shares this short but significant thought, “Don’t let people pull you into their storm. Pull them into your peace.”

What direction is the pull in our leadership? Do we find ourselves pulled into the storms raging in the lives of others, or do we seek to pull them into the peace only found in Christ?

1) We must first be at peace ourselves.
2) Make sure to point people to Jesus––to focus on Him.
3) Offer a hand up, not a handout.
4) The best course is always faith.

Peace and trust is critically important to the direction of our pull.

Why Lead?

Why do people lead?

Some lead for the power. They simply want authority over others to direct them.

Some lead out of a crisis. When crisis strikes, individuals are often forced into leadership.

Others lead because no one else will. When godly leaders do not rise up, others will, but not always in the right direction.

Still, some lead for the joy of it. They strive to develop godly and Christlike character, and desire to lead others to Christ.

Paul referred to those who led with both wrong motives and the right one. Examine why you lead, and learn to lead for the joy of an eternal outcome.

Risk

Risk involves the possibility of danger or harm.

There can be low risk and high risk, but risk is part of leadership.

The key to understanding the role of risk in leadership is learning how not to fear risk, but manage it instead.

Consider two questions in application to risks involved for spiritual leaders.

1) What are the risk factors involved if we decide not to lead others to Christ?
2) What are the risks of waiting, or procrastinating, to lead them?

When we look from a spiritual perspective at how the risks weigh out in our leadership, we find the possibility of danger or harm involved.

I Can

Eliminating the word “can’t” from the vocabulary is vital to the development of strong leadership. We have all heard, “It can’t be done.”

Bo Bennett said, “Having a positive mental attitude is asking how something can be done rather than saying it can’t be done.”

The way we see our families, the church, the world, and even ourselves takes on a new perspective when we realize we can do it.

Instead of approaching it like Moses, “Who am I that I should go and deliver this people?” we need more like Isaiah, “Here am I, send me.”

Remember, “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.”

Connection

Have you ever observed people at the mall, grocery store, bank, airport, or driving down the highway. Who are they? Where do they live? Where are they going? Are they married? Do they have children…grandchildren? Do they believe in God?

The questions are endless. The number of people in this world is mind boggling.

The only way to know anything about them is to get involved in their lives. It is a challenging step. How can we lead them to Jesus without this connection?

Leading anyone to Christ involves moving past our fear and getting connected. The emotional connection of genuine love makes all the difference.

Farewells

At times, leaders are asked to leave and sometimes they choose to leave. How a leader walks away determines the nature of how they are remembered.

Shattered farewells leave everyone hurting.

Divisive farewells leave followers turned against one another.

Venomous farewells leave a feeling of animosity, anger, distrust, and a lack of direction.

Gracious farewells leave followers united with a greater dedication to achieve the established vision, goals, and will of God that strengthen the overall good of everyone.

At some point, we say goodbye and when the time comes we must decide the level of integrity and Christlike character we will demonstrate.

Conversations Worth Talking About

Do we have anything worth talking about?

Far too many conversations revolve around subjects of little consequence. Kin Hubbard says, ”Don’t knock the weather. If it didn’t change once in a while, nine-tenths of the people couldn’t start a conversation.”

When we consider our influence for Christ, it makes sense that we focus our conversations on spiritual matters?

When we consider eternity, our conversations change with those we encounter in life?

When we consider the condition of our world, do we ever wonder about our responsibility to others?

Our time on earth is more than the trivial pursuit of fruitless knowledge.

The good news of Jesus is something worth talking about!