Tag: Church

Leadership Development…

One of the great struggles facing the church today involves leadership development.

Congregations struggle with poorly equipped––if not unqualified––leaders, or no leadership at all. Sadly, far too many congregations have no idea who will fill the needed leadership positions of tomorrow.

It raises the question, “Are we suffering the consequences of past failures to plan for leadership?”

As we gaze into 2021, God’s people should recognize the challenge, and current leaders must rise up to prepare leaders for the future.

What we need is a vision that benefits the Lord’s kingdom with experienced leaders in the next generation, because it impacts our children and grandchildren!

Developing Others to Lead…

Managers within the Chipotle food chain are promoted on the bases of how they develop leaders among their employees.

Instead of being consumed with the fear of being out-performed, shown-up, or otherwise replaced, imagine the growth of the church where leaders constantly develop others to lead.

Imagine what would happen within the church.

Jesus demonstrated this in developing the apostles for the task of evangelizing the world.

Paul instructed older men to set an example of a godly life and older women to teach younger women matters of the home.

We influence others everyday. Let us mentor them to lead.

Redirecting Our Focus…

We are all molded by the events of the past, whether teaching, experience, or influence. Each of these take on both a positive and negative trait.

Paul’s family heritage, academic credentials, knowledge of scripture, and zealous attack against the church left a mark he did not forget from his past.

However, he did not allow the past to dictate the direction of his future. Paul had a new spiritual focus.

Leaders must learn from the past in order to prevent repeating areas that hinder our Christian influence.

The challenges of yesterday are past. We need to redirect our attention toward a spiritual future.

Unprecedented Leadership…

Unprecedented seems to be the most common description of 2020, more specifically, the coronavirus pandemic. As uncertainty looms, how do leaders respond?

As we explore the possibilities, one factor is clear: Returning to the way things were before is not a reality, at least not in the foreseeable future.

Perhaps we should ask if returning to the way things were before is best for the church.

Crises present opportunities. How we approach these opportunities impacts the direction of the church and her leaders.

During these times, let’s focus on how to use these opportunities to lead in ways that grow the kingdom.

Leading God’s Family…

Nothing is more comforting than going home after being away.

The defining qualities of home make all the difference.

Home is special because we belong, we are members of a family or household.

Spiritually, the church is where we belong, where we are members of God’s family. Perhaps this is why the Bible speaks of the eternal dwelling God has prepared for us.

While on earth, the church should provide the same comforts of home.

Opposite of the corporate body, often connected to the church, leaders need to encourage and strengthen the idea of the church as family…home.

Peace…

Peace is often associated with the absence of conflict, but the Hebrew word shalom and the Greek word eirênê both carry the idea of wholeness and harmony.

Kenneson points out that promotion of individualism strikes at the heart of achieving biblical peace, and the privatization of faith takes individualism even further. Many speak of a “personal relationship with Jesus,” meaning one’s own “private” relationship.

Perhaps this explains why so many “self-professed Christians believe they can be perfectly good Christians apart from the church” (92).

Compartmentalizing life, defending personal rights, and sanctioning violence are a few of the ways peace is attacked.

Incorporating baptism, encouraging, edifying, admonishing, and forgiving one another are a few ways to support biblical peace.

Pleasing Everyone…

An effort to please everyone is doomed to fail. Marco Rubio said, “We live in a society obsessed with public opinion. But leadership has never been about popularity.”

Sadly, the adage about the “squeaky wheel” is true. Those who complain the most and loudest tend to get action.

The church needs leaders who… 1) examine scripture to ensure decisions are biblical, 2) do not follow the flow of modern popularity, 3) never rush a decision, but do not hesitate between two opinions either, 4) make the decision, 5) remember, not every decision will please everyone.

The responsibility of decisive leadership is crucial to the future.

Actions and Motives…

Leaders give of their time and ability. They possess a willingness to help others reach their greatest potential for God and His church.

Leaders are also selfless. While the ideas are interrelated and it can become difficult to distinguish them, the difference is the action of one and the motivation in the other. 

Effective leadership makes the sacrifice, but the reason they make it is the selfless heart of God’s servant.

William Barclay once said, “Always give without remembering; always receive without forgetting.”

The thought speaks to actions and motives. It should motivate us to lead this way.

Relational Leadership…

“Leaders aren’t built in a day––they’re built over a season. Leadership development is not a class you take––it’s an intentional relationship you build.” Mac Lake

Leaders know that leadership is about people. Without building relationships with others, the work of leading is arduous.

This thought is even more crucial when we consider the necessity of developing others to lead. When leaders intentionally focus on relationships with future leaders, these leaders blossom and secure the future of the church.

The time invested makes a difference for every aspect of leadership development.

Involved = Learning…

One of the greatest lessons for learning comes from Ben Franklin, “Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.”

No matter what age group, this thought has application.

Leadership in the home means we must involve children so they learn.

Educational leaders must involve students if they are to learn.

As spiritual leaders within the church, we must know the value of this thought if we are to help the church move from complacency and apathy to learning.

When it comes to an application of biblical principles, involve people in ways that result in learning.