Tag: Church

Learning In Community

Few times are more exciting than sitting around a table with others to collaborate ideas. Discussing and planning every area of life serves to improve leadership.

These times provide inspiration by gleaning from the wisdom and experience of those closest to us. Here we find guidance from others who care most for us. They desire to see us succeed.

Spiritually, few opportunities are more important than to examine ways to strengthen the church and lead others to a greater hope.

The change in life that makes the greatest difference in who we are and what we do is born from the benefits of what is learned in community.

Value and Worth

Although the source is unknown, consider this thought, “Surround yourself with people who know your worth. You don’t need too many people to be happy, just a few REAL ones who can appreciate you for who you are.”

Confidence and esteem are lacking in general.

Leaders have the responsibility of showing appreciation for those who need to grow in their confidence.

Think about what it would do for the church to know the value and worth of our contribution and to help others see their value and worth.

Negativity is destructive. We must find a way to avoid negative influences and surround ourselves with positive ones that build worth.

Who, How, and Why

Three significant questions surface in your leadership.

First, “Who are you trying to reach?” Churches often talk about trying to reach their communities, but rarely are they willing to take the necessary steps to do so. The answer here makes a difference in the direction and steps taken in the next question.

Second, “How will you reach them?” It may take specific marketing technique, extra time in the community, developing stronger relationships, financial means, or additional people. You must be willing to do whatever it takes.

Third, and perhaps most importantly, “Why are you doing this?” If you can’t answer this question with certainty and clarity, people will not follow long.

Agree or Disagree?

One of the most common phrases used when people cannot come to an agreement is “we will just have to agree to disagree.” What exactly does this accomplish in the realm of spiritual leadership?

If agreeing to disagree allows both expressions to be correct, then we are headed for a train wreck in the spiritual realm.

Imagine the difference in the church today if leaders applied the same principles of interpretation and agreed to work together until unity could be achieved.

Imagine if the pride of self-righteousness were put aside with the intent of seeking to truly listen to God’s word and simply follow it…only.

What’s Missing?

What seems to be missing from the type of leadership God needs for His people?

If you were asked this question, how would you respond? What kind of answer would you give? What is missing in leadership today?

Perhaps the list would include courage, patience, wisdom, character, vision, compassion, or even decisiveness.

The answer to the question may rest in the nature of each situation. The culture in one congregation varies from that of another. The needs of one congregation are different from another.

Before we think about what’s missing somewhere else, maybe we should begin at home.

Take the Risk

“Nothing ventured, nothing gained” is an idiom related to risk. Few areas in life witness true and great success without some level of risk.

The willingness to take risks opens us up to an area that allows God to demonstrate the greatness of His power, exceeding our ability to think.

Instead of hiding behind a fear that inhibits our growth and development as the church, leaders need to explore the possibilities of what can happen if we just allow God to work through us, beyond the comfort zones of our past traditions and extend our abilities into areas that promise faith and hope.

Questions for the Heart

“Did I offer peace today? Did I bring a smile to someone’s face? Did I say words of healing? Did I let go of my anger and resentment? Did I forgive? Did I love? These are the real questions. I must trust that the little bit of love that I sow now will bear many fruits, here in this world and the life to come.” Henri Nouwen

Imagine a congregation where, at the end of the day, everyone took the time to answer these questions affirmatively. If we focused on putting the needs, concerns, cares, worries, and desires of others first, the church and this world would sure be a different place.

A Leader’s Response

How will leaders in our world respond to the tragedy in Ukraine?

How will leaders in the Lord’s church respond? Tragedy tends to bring opportunity, opportunity most often met with physical provisions. Will we be satisfied to send money, food, water, and clothing?

These are needed, but this tragedy should remind us of the opportunity to help people prepare for something the future holds.

Many lives have been lost and more injured.

Spiritually, the opportunity is ours. Jesus warned us of a great day coming. All will stand before Him. Are we prepared? Are we preparing others?

Culture

Basically, culture involves common experiences within a definable group. Grunter and Whitaker have said, “The culture of any organization is shaped by the worst behavior the leader is willing to tolerate.”

Consider the implications of this thought as it relates to the worst behavior tolerated by leadership. If the response of individuals within an organization emulates the lowest level of behavior tolerated by leaders, what cultural identity will characterize the organization? The church?

The result is contagious, discouraging, and destructive to our influence.

Growth and development are worth the effort to raise the level of behavior by the discipline needed to ensure a stronger culture.

Sacrificial Leadership

To lead is to sacrifice. Sacrifice is found at every level of leadership. How great of sacrifice is required? Are we willing to make the sacrifice?

The apostle Paul was one who made great sacrifices in serving the Lord and His church.

First, Paul claimed nothing held more value than knowing Christ Jesus.
Second, Paul’s suffering was not just past tense. It was future tense also.

If we go below the surface and examine Paul’s leadership, we find a leader of great sacrifice. His level of sacrifice is exemplified throughout his writings (2 Cor. 11:23-29).

Let us arise to the same example.