Tag: Communication

Transitional Leadership

Transitions build bridges between the various components of our communication. These bridges make it easier for people to follow what we attempt to express.

As leaders, our role is about transitions. We build bridges in three areas.

We build a bridge in relationships. Unless we establish and maintain quality relationships, our transition into spiritual matters falls short.

We build a bridge for future leaders. There will always be a need for leadership, now and the future. We must make this transition smooth.

We build a bridge to eternity. Ultimately, the task before us is to help make the transition from the physical realm to the spiritual.

Leadership Download

Think about the concept of “downloading.” Literally, the idea is about transferring information from one source to another in an understandable format.

Downloading a virus can hinder, shut down, and/or destroy the function of your device.

Computers also download updates beneficial to the overall performance of the device.

Spiritual leaders know followers are constantly downloading information from them. Is the information hindering, shutting down, or destroying the function of their service? Are they providing information in an understandable, beneficial format? Does the information improve the overall performance of the individual or group?

Leaders make a difference. Make sure those who follow download the right material.

Informing Others

The challenge to leadership exists when there is a lack of communication.

When leaders do not keep others informed, people grow suspicious, begin to distrust leaders, doubt a leaders ability, and become anxious.

However, when leaders keep others informed, great things can happen.

What kind of information needs to be provided?

Inform others why changes are being made.
Inform others of the plans for the change.
Inform others of who will be needed to accomplish the change.
Inform others of challenges / or hindrances facing the plans.
Inform others of the needs.

When leaders communicate / inform others, trustworthy and loyal relationships develop. It is time for God’s leaders to lead.

Prayer of a Leader

Too often, prayer is used like a spare tire; we pull it out of the trunk when something goes wrong and we need a little help until everything is patched up.

Prayer is also seen a last ditch effort when everything else we try fails.

Prayer is the beautiful expression of a heart that beats in rhythm with God. Leaders understand the need to walk in relationship with God. Thus, leaders find themselves in constant communication with the One who leads us all.

Consider men like Enoch (Gen. 5), Noah (Gen. 6), Abraham (Gen. 12), the prophets, and apostles, who led lives in harmony with God.

Encouraging Words

We cannot measure the impact of an encouraging word spoken at the right time. Yet, we can see the fruit born in the lives of those who receive it.

People need hope. They want to know they can overcome the obstacles encountered on this journey through life.

People want to know they are loved. Communicating in a language they understand takes many forms, but one that always carries weight is a word of encouragement.

Take a moment each day to write a note, make a call, or stop and speak to someone who can use a little encouragement and watch the difference it makes.

Listening

One of the most challenging components of communication is listening.

We are easily distracted by our cell phone, computer, local environment, and a hundred other factors.

We often think of leaders as those out front, giving instruction, direction, and orders.

However, there are several critical reasons leaders must learn the art of listening.

Listening helps you connect with people.
Listening helps you gain a better understanding of their needs.
Listening helps you develop stronger concentration.

Learn to listen with your ears, eyes, and heart. As challenging as it is, being a good listener will change the nature of your leadership.

Tone, Pace, and Volume

I once asked a group of men about how to improve communication as leaders. While I received several responses, one that resonated well with me involved three words: Tone, Pace, and Volume.

The tone we use to communicate impacts the attitude with which our message is received.

The pace of our communication determines the level in which it is understood.

The volume we use to communicate influences how well the message is accepted.

It is worth the time and effort to ensure that the tone, pace, and volume used to communicate our message is appropriate for positive reception, understanding, and acceptance.

Powerful Communication

How can leaders ensure their message is understood?

Have a clear understanding of the past, present, and future. How did you get here? Where are you now? What direction are you headed?

Prepare a strong defense as to why you are communicating this specific message at this specific time.

Plan how the destination will be reached and communicate it often to ensure no one forgets.

Implement a confirmation brief, which means you ask others to explain what they heard you say.

It takes time and effective communication to get everyone on the same page.

A Leading Question

A leading question is an attempt to get someone else to communicate their understanding of facts, knowledge, or feelings. From a legal perspective, it is often used to get someone to answer a question in a specific way, leading them to often incriminate themselves or someone else.

At times, leaders may need to use both. We use questions for several reasons.

1) When others are encouraged to communicate, they feel appreciated and important.

2) We learn more by listening. We learn about feelings, desires, struggles, joys, and sorrows.

3) We create a powerful learning environment. Leaders will be surprised what they learn when creative minds are unleashed.

Global Leadership

The world’s population is beyond my comprehension. When I consider eight billion people, it simply becomes a number.

As I travel, the reality of this number becomes even more incredible. I think about…

The plethora of languages.
My inability to communicate adequately.
The brief time I spend in each location.
How do all of these people come to know Christ?
Their soul.
What can and needs to be done?

I have more questions than answers.

I am thankful for the dedication and willingness of mission minded leaders who have and continue to lead on a soil different than their own.