Tag: Decisions

Deliberate and Intentional

How many times have you procrastinated when making decisions? Your intentions were good because you were waiting for the “right time.”

This can happen when beginning a family, i.e. getting married or having children. We also see it in areas of career choices. I’ve heard, “If you don’t love what you do, then do something else. Life is too short to not enjoy what you do each day.”

Our lives should be deliberate and intentional. Once we choose the area we are most passionate about, then jump in. When we do what we love the most, joy finds a way into our lives.

Choices

In our lifetime we will make millions of decisions. Most of these decisions come with little or no consequential value. Obviously, we know some decisions carry major consequences: who one marries, where they live, having children, and a career are a few.

How powerful is it to realize each day provides an opportunity to make the right choices?

No leader is exempt from making wrong decisions. The key is how we handle ourselves when the wrong decisions are made and how we approach making the right ones in the future.

Decisive Leadership

There are two key elements to being decisive we need to develop.

The first is the idea of sound decisions. The soundness of a decision is going to be subjective based on the moral compass of the individual. From a spiritual leadership perspective, the soundness of one’s decisions will be based on a Biblical compass.

The second involves the word timely. We have all heard, and perhaps experienced, the idea of “timing is everything.” With much prayer, spiritual leaders will seek to make decisions in keeping with God’s timing.

When we make decisions that are both sound and timely, our leadership develops greater credibility.

Finding Our Strength (Part 1)

When the depths of discouragement engulf us, we seek the strength to endure and make the right decisions.

The answer is not always about knowing what scripture says, because simply knowing scripture does not help when the heart is in a dark place.

Likewise, it is not always about surrounding ourselves with friends because friends provide little comfort when our desire is to be alone.

Where does the strength come from when we face difficult times? How can we pull everything together to move forward?

Please read tomorrow’s post as I will discuss two possibilities.

Leading with Joy

Stress usually saps the joy right out of most decision making. The challenges leaders face become foundational reasons why many choose not to lead.

As long as leaders spend their time dealing with conflict resolution, personality differences, and resource management, then the emotional depletion levels will exceed the ability and desire to continue.

There is a joy in leading and there are positive areas to support the future development and growth of any organization. When leadership receives encouragement to create, innovate, initiate, and motivate, the possibilities are endless for success.

The combination of a vision, goals, and plans, coupled with the authority to lead excites joy in leading.

Courageous Leadership

Leaders need courage, but what does that mean?

We often think of courage as a quality or characteristic that people possess or develop. Some people have it and some do not.

However, courage is a decision to act bravely when you are scared to death. It is easy to say we have courage when everything operates smoothly, but what about in times of challenge, controversy, or conflict?

It takes courage to stand against the influences of false teaching, to address disciplinary matters, to stand for right decisions (even if unpopular or unaccepted by some), and do so with a gentleness and love that demonstrates concern for every individual.

Procrastination

Procrastination can be one of the most destructive traits in anyone’s life, especially leaders.

It might not be a problem if the decision is inconsequential. If, however, the decision carries consequential value, then procrastinating can be devastating.

Why do people procrastinate?

1) Fear of making the wrong decision
2) Lack of adequate information
3) Not a priority to the decision maker(s)
4) Need for 100% agreement
5) Comfortable with the status quo

There are more, but the results are the same.

When procrastination appears to be a common approach, confidence in leadership wanes and apathy results. Why care about anything if making a decision takes too long?

Conscious or Conscience?

Some words always seem to be difficult when determining their use. Effect or affect? Insure or ensure?

Another pair that falls into this category is conscious or conscience.

However, these words are significant when thinking about leadership.

Consciousness involves an awareness or ability to respond to one’s surroundings. Leaders understand the need to demonstrate an awareness of surroundings when making decisions or actions in response to specific situations.

Conscience, oddly enough, relates to that inner voice that acts as a guide regarding right and wrong behavior. Specifically, the conscience of a leader must be exemplified by the moral decisions made each day.

The Right Character

Leaders know stressful situations will come. The obvious concern involves how we deal with those situations and the consequences.

We also know how our character influences those decisions. Therefore, we must strive to maintain the kind of character that moves us toward right decisions.

Our oldest son once said, “As leaders, the ability to make the right decision during a stressful situation is made easier by having the right character because all the unethical choices are automatically removed.”

Think about it. When leaders possess and maintain the right character, choices are clearer because any choice that borders on an unethical intent is not an option.

Rating Our Leadership

We enjoy the idea of rating performance, looks, ability, etc. and, generally, we use a scale from 1 to 10. How would we rate our leadership?

While consistent standards are helpful, we need to realize a couple of factors.

1) People will rate our leadership (whether we like it or not).
2) Our rating is based on ability, decisions, relationships, and previous success.
3) We will give an account to God for our leadership.
4) The final measuring device will be God’s word.

Changing our rating is up to us. When we use God’s word, on a scale of 1 to 10, how will our leadership measure up?