Tag: Future

Vision and Mission

In an effort to develop a vision and mission statement, we often get the ideas reversed, and rightfully so, since they are interrelated.

The mission of an organization, specifically the church, describes “what to do.” The foundation is built on the purpose of our existence and the mission directs every decision for all related activities.

The vision describes what we desire to see as a result of the mission. The vision takes into consideration the image of the future that connects the long-term desires with achievable goals.

We must communicate both the vision and mission if we hope to achieve any level of success.

The Middle

As the days, weeks, months, and years fly by, taking a moment somewhere in the middle to evaluate and ask a few questions seems appropriate.

What have we done to reach our goals and achieve the vision? Would our assessment indicate progress, or are adjustments needed to move forward? Should our goals be raised because we aimed too low, or lowered because we were too ambitious initially?

Midway allows us to evaluate our progress to determine how we lead into the future. From this position we have a better perspective of what the future looks like and how we can cast a greater vision for what lies ahead.

Better Leadership

One of the key words to the book of Hebrews is better. We live under a better covenant, based on better promises, because of a better sacrifice, the sacrifice of Jesus Himself.

The result is obviously a better hope for the future.

What does all this mean for leaders?

When we examine our leadership character, attitude, work ethic, practice, or presence, can we say it is better than previously?

When we consider the development of those who follow our leadership, would it be said they are better today than yesterday?

Are we willing to do what it takes to make it better?

The Future of Leadership

Leading is about the future. From a spiritual perspective, nothing is more important than what the eternal future holds.

However, on a more pragmatic level, leaders need to consider what the future of their leadership looks like.

Will the future hold growth and development for the church or will we be stagnant?

Will our vision point to a future where leadership is stronger or will leadership decline?

Asking questions can be unending. Yet, in the end, we must consider the necessity of planning today to ensure the future of growth and stronger leadership.

To do so, requires us to have a vision for it!

Igniting Passion to Lead

People around the world follow someone. Generally, they follow the one that influences them most.

If we reject the responsibility to shine the light of Jesus, who will people follow?

It would seem that the only possibility is the ruler of this world, the one who leads them into darkness.

Are we ready to accept the consequences of such a decision?

Leadership is not an easy task. We are often left vulnerable when we open ourselves up in order to reach out to the world. However, the result of leading others to Christ ignites a passion that drives the future of our leadership, and that of others.

Prepared by the Past

I once saw a billboard with the following statement, “The past does not define, it prepares.”

Perspective proves to be reality for all of us. When we consider the perspective we hold on our past, it is amazing how often we define our lives by it.

Regardless of what has happened, good or bad, success or failure, how different would the future be if we lived with the perspective that our past only prepared us from something greater?

We cannot live in the past. We certainly cannot change it. Why not use the opportunity to view the past as a foundation for the future God has in store?

Near and Far Sighted

The eye is an amazing part of the human body, but there is not enough space to cover its complex intricacies.

However, as we age, our arm does not often extend quite far enough to read the print on a page.

Two conditions normally occur: 1) nearsightedness – the ability to see things up close, but not far away, or 2) farsightedness – the ability to see things far away, but not up close.

Spiritually, leaders must avoid both conditions. Leaders need the ability to see needs that exist up close (present), and they must see what will happen far away (future).

Seeing both near and far makes it possible to address current needs and plan for the future.

Godly Counsel

In the Psalms, David expresses the need to wait for the counsel of the Lord, because His counsel will endure forever.

Solomon claims a wise man is one who listens to wise counsel. One of the best Proverbs about counsel is found in Proverbs 27:9 where we read, “A man’s counsel is sweet to his friend.”

When leaders provide godly counsel, several beautiful things occur: 1) God is glorified, 2) His people are built up in the faith, 3) Leadership is strengthened, and 4) The future is secured.

Let leaders learn to pursue and provide godly counsel.

A Great Responsibility

When Paul wrote Timothy, he used an interesting word translated entrust. The idea was to take what was entrusted to him and entrust it to others.

At the root of this word is the concept of placing before or into the hand of another. It represents responsibility. Whatever was placed into the hand carried a responsibility of placing into the hand of someone else that it might be perpetuated into the future.

When we apply the concept to leadership, this principle indicates a succession that leaders must consider for the future. How seriously do we take this responsibility?

Leadership Scars

Most people have scars. They are the result of surgery, an accident, or some foolish activity.

Scars can also be emotional, mental, and spiritual, often left for the same reasons.

What do scars leave behind?

They leave us with a reminder of what caused it.

Scars remind us of pain involved.
Scars show us the incredible wisdom and power of God.
Scars serve as a reminder to be cautious about creating future scars.

The greatest reminder of scars is found in the hands and feet of our Savior. The example that left Him with these scars should always be a reminder of what our leadership is all about.