Tag: Growth

Complexity of Leadership

Life is complicated. Just when we feel like we have a good handle on it, something changes. Even when we have a vision, spend hours setting goals and establishing plans, there seems to always be that one item that throws us a “curve ball.”

Leadership can be tricky. As complicated as life can be, when leading others, the complexities increase.

Providing structure is essential to understanding the nature in which all the components required to achieve our vision are implemented.

This structure keeps everyone focused and active.

The work can be difficult, but when it is accomplished, everyone grows.

Measuring Our Leadership

We tend to gauge success by tangible measurements, but is everything that easily measured?

How do we measure someone’s knowledge? How do we measure the long-term impact of the gospel once the seed is sown? How should we approach our leadership within the church?

Leave the measuring to God. He has an accurate way of measuring what happens.

Be consistent. Measure growth in another location by the same standard in our own.

Remember, goals are important and our job is to plant and water.
God will give the increase.

If we do our part, God will do His and the measurement will always be right.

Growing Our Leadership

Growing pains can be…well, painful. There are times we get discouraged with growth as it brings challenges.

Thelma Davis said, “To get to the next level your spirit has to be stretched. Don’t be discouraged by the growing pains. Promotion is a process.”

The process is critical to achieving the desired result, and the more we keep our focus on that result, the more likely we are to succeed.

Consider this…
Be open to the stretching your heart and mind.
Stay focused and encouraged during the growing pains (remember the goal).
Remember patience is needed while experiencing the process.
Results speak for themselves and are worth it all.

A Vigilant Leader…

Vigilance means to be watchful, specifically a careful watch regarding areas presenting danger or difficulty.

Few areas rival the need for leaders to be vigilant concerning their responsibilities.

Leaders carefully watch over…
…the spiritual growth and development of each Christian.
…the physical concerns inside and outside of the church.
…the influence of the church within the community.
…the missional outreach of the gospel to the world.

The list could address more but the direction is obvious.

The responsibility is great and when leaders are vigilant to the task before them they can take advantage of beautifully choreographed God given opportunities.

A Season for Leading

We all sense a change in the season.

Changes in the season indicate the value and beauty of variety and the lesson for leadership is important.

Everyone has a preference connected to the style of leadership they like to follow. There is, however, value to recognizing the benefits of a variety. A variety in leadership style can…

  1. Provide different perspectives.
  2. Eliminate limitations for growth.
  3. Encourage creativity among followers.
  4. Increase the opportunity for leadership development.

The message in our leadership does not change, but the style / method by which we approach that message may need a change of season.

A Leadership Method

What method is used to improve our understanding of spiritual leadership?

What method will best grow or develop our spiritual focus?

What method will we implement to achieve the goals established for those we lead?

Several years ago, I heard someone say, “Any method will work, if we will work the method.”

Improvement, growth, and implementation are words that indicate work. Something has to be done in order to achieve our goals and the method designed is the means by which it will be accomplished.

Determining the right method is a key component to our leadership.

Growth and Development…

Max DePree once said, “In the end, it is important to remember that we cannot become what we need to be, by remaining what we are.”

The consequences of remaining in our present situation should motivate us to overcome the stagnate condition that ultimately ends in death.

Becoming what we need to be points us to God and His guidance.

Seek God’s help for the vision to see what He wants us to be, to make us what we need to be, and to never be content with remaining what we are.

Ontogeny and Leadership…

Ontogeny is the process of an individual organism growing organically.

Thinking of the church as an organization goes against the living and growing organism God intended.

We understand the need to care for, protect, provide, and strengthen plants, animals, and human life because they are organisms that are alive, and proper growth only occurs when we practice the right care.

How much more so would God want us to demonstrate the same toward His church?

Even if we never see the word “ontogeny” again, let us practice the necessary areas to produce growth of the one organism that required the life of Jesus.

Possibilities of Can…

Eliminating the word “can’t” from our vocabulary is vital to the development of strong leadership. Have you ever heard, or perhaps said, “It can’t be done”?

The limitations built around this idea paralyze the growth and development of God’s people, individually and collectively.

Instead of shackling ourselves with these limitations, consider the difference made by realizing what “can” be done. With God, all things are possible.

The way we see our families, the church, the world, and even ourselves takes on a new perspective when we realize we can do it.

Contented Leaders…

Contentment has both a positive and negative perspective when placed alongside concepts that frame our leadership. For example, “Always be content with where you are, but never who you are.”

The idea is to accept and be content with what we have and where we are in life, but we should always hunger to grow and improve in our personal development.

There is a place for contentment, but we must not allow contentment to follow a path of complacency and a “comfortable with the status quo” way of thinking.

The contrast between content and discontent makes the difference in how we approach the future of leadership.