Tag: Learning

Developing Tomorrow’s Leaders…

What are we doing about the present condition of leadership? What are we doing about the future of leadership? What are we doing to develop biblical leaders?

Challenges exist in every effort to improve the situation. These attempts are often viewed with skepticism.

Enthusiasm to learn and implement something new or different is dismissed as youthful, but lacking long-term substance.

What are we doing to change eternity if the only thing we are doing is exactly what we have done for the past 50 years? The results speak for themselves.

We need to recognize where we are, where we are going, and what we must do to get there.

Mentoring Leaders…

The purpose and design of mentoring is to create a relationship that nurtures learning. One of the key components required is responsibility.

A learner takes responsibility for the priorities, learning, and resources for achieving self-direction. The idea expresses moving “from dependence to independence to interdependence” (3).

Several elements are also essential to a learning-centered mentoring program: reciprocity, relationship, partnership, collaboration, mutually defined goals, and development.

These elements are designed to promote relationships that motivate, inspire, and contribute to development and growth.

For more information, read Lois Zachary’s book, The Mentor’s Guide, Facilitating Effective Learning Relationships.

A Learning Leader…

The subjects of leadership and learning are interrelated. John F. Kennedy said, “Leadership and learning are indispensable to each other.”

A mindset that exists, often referred to as a leadership myth, is the idea that once someone becomes a leader they having nothing left to learn. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Arrogance is a dangerous attitude to possess. It leads to a lack of gratitude, separation, and a delusional personality. Ultimately, it destroys any possibility of leading from a godly position.

Leaders must constantly learn. They must be, as Wayne Roberts has said, “A student of the Word and of the world.”

Both require one to be a learner.

Involved = Learning…

One of the greatest lessons for learning comes from Ben Franklin, “Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.”

No matter what age group, this thought has application.

Leadership in the home means we must involve children so they learn.

Educational leaders must involve students if they are to learn.

As spiritual leaders within the church, we must know the value of this thought if we are to help the church move from complacency and apathy to learning.

When it comes to an application of biblical principles, involve people in ways that result in learning.

Leaders Who Learn…

The truly successful managers and leaders of the next century will be determined not by what they know but by how fast they can learn! ~ Strategy & Business

The nature and speed of change in our world should not deter us from pursuing effective leadership.

We should not become discouraged when making decisions.

Also, we must avoid dwelling in the past, frustrated by technology, and give up.

We should be motivated to learn and learn quickly.

Our purpose must be driven by this desire, because learning helps us discover greater ways to influence others for Christ.

Student Leaders…

As a teacher, many factors determine a successful classroom experience.

We may use visual aids (PowerPoint, whiteboard or handouts). We may incorporate dialogue. 

Whatever we choose, the bottom-line involves learning. Is the student learning the material presented?

The most common mistake is that teachers teach and students learn. This mentality leads to a lecture style of teaching and avoids discussion that might challenge the thinking of the teacher.

As a leader, we must first be a student ourselves. We need to use every opportunity to learn from others.

Each person has knowledge, life experience, and abilities that should make the classroom a place where everyone learns.