Tag: Patience

Ambition

Our ambition must have a spiritual focus, pleasing the Lord!

When our leadership is about pleasing the Lord it changes our approach to every area of life.

Relationships within our families are shaped by Biblical principles.

Our conduct on the job is influenced by a God-fearing attitude.

Approaching people outside of Christ is filled with a greater level of patience and compassion.

Beyond everything else, we worship with a greater understanding of our sovereign God.

When our leadership is driven by this kind of ambition the church will grow in the grace and knowledge of our Savior.

Moses

God claimed Moses to be the meekest man on earth.

Recognizing his willingness to follow the advice of Jethro, preserving his mental and physical faculties, we find a great Bible leader.

However, Moses is an example of a great Bible leader because he started like most of us, denying God’s power to use him to lead His people. When Moses finally submitted himself to God’s authority and direction, we find Moses becoming what God needed.

He had flaws, required patience, and he had to learned that God must be treated as holy.

The lesson to learn is how God can use us with our flaws and imperfections.

A Leader’s Golden Rule

Several variations of the “Golden Rule” are commonly known. It might be “do unto others as they have done unto you,” or “do unto others before they do unto you.”

However, Jesus said “do unto others as you would have them do unto you.”

How do we want to be treated as a leader? With respect, understanding, love, appreciation, patience, etc.? If this is how we want to be treated, Jesus would tell us to treat others this way first!

If we are not careful, it is easy to react, instead of acting as we should. We must also be careful to guard against overreacting.

Defining Leadership Character

What characteristic defines our leadership? When we examine that characteristic closely, are we able to recognize what makes it distinct?

The defining nature of our leadership sets us apart as leaders. This distinctiveness enables us to have the kind of influence needed to help others reach their potential, to become all God wants for them.

Leaders carry the responsibility of developing the kind of character that creates a distinction for their influence. This distinction provides defining qualities of leadership that make a difference.

Consider the following:

1) Learn what is necessary to achieve the goal.
2) Determine to do whatever it takes.
3) Be patient.

Growing Our Leadership

Growing pains can be…well, painful. There are times we get discouraged with growth as it brings challenges.

Thelma Davis said, “To get to the next level your spirit has to be stretched. Don’t be discouraged by the growing pains. Promotion is a process.”

The process is critical to achieving the desired result, and the more we keep our focus on that result, the more likely we are to succeed.

Consider this…
Be open to the stretching your heart and mind.
Stay focused and encouraged during the growing pains (remember the goal).
Remember patience is needed while experiencing the process.
Results speak for themselves and are worth it all.

Dangerous Procrastination

Too often, leaders convince themselves they are not quite ready, and so they wait, and wait.

Lemony Snicket tells us, “If we wait until we’re ready, we’ll be waiting for the rest of our lives.”

What exactly will get us ready? More money? More education? Greater opportunity? Time?

There will always be more questions than answers, but at some point we have to ask, “How will we know we are ready/”

Patience is a virtue, but if we keep waiting, chances are we may never be ready.

The decision is ours. Let’s not wait.

Patient Leaders…

Successful leadership does not consist of leading people in the same way because people are not the same. Timber Hawkeye resounded this thought, “Flowers only bloom when they are ready. People are the same way.
You cannot rush or force them open just because you think it’s time. Be patient.”

The principles of leadership never change. People, however, learn and advance differently. Some pick up on the process quickly, while others learn at a slower pace.

Any attempt to rush or force people into places or positions when and where they are not ready simply frustrates everyone involved.

Self-Aware Leaders…

An amazing inward benefit occurs when we outwardly recognize the pains and struggles of others.

Amyra Mah said it this way, “As I learned to accept myself, I began to relate to people on a deeper level and saw that everyone comes with their own pains and struggles. I learned to appreciate them for their flaws as much as their strengths, which in turn helped me to accept myself more.”

Self-perception benefits leaders with an awareness of their strengths and weaknesses, along with an understanding of how to help others with the same.

The beauty of this discovery results in compassion, sympathy, empathy, and patience.

Patience…

Patience is often said to be a desired virtue, but one we fail to demonstrate.

In a society geared toward productivity, the clock becomes a slave driver and the loss of control challenges every level of patience.

Kenneson identifies patience as yielding control to another (109). Biblical patience is others-directed.

Obstacles include segmenting, regulating, and hoarding time, as well as, exalting productivity, and the desire for speed.

Patience is cultivated by remembering God’s patience with us in times we stumble through life determining our place in His redemptive story. We also cultivate patience by thinking of time differently, as a gift instead of commodity.

Observant Leaders…

Consider the power of observation.

Alert: When leaders are alert they quickly notice anything unusual or potentially dangerous. The spiritual battle requires alert leaders.

Watchful: Followers need leaders who are carefully watch over the lives entrusted to their care. Observant leaders are watchful. 

Aware: Leaders demonstrate awareness when they possess knowledge or perception of a situation or fact.

Attentive: Leaders must observe every detail.

Other ideas could be used, but the basis for success is found in being observant. Observant leadership is not easy. It requires diligence, time, patience, and great love.