Tag: Patience

A Patient Leader

Biblical patience has an object, not patience for the purpose of patience, but for the sake of another.

The obstacles to patience include segmenting, regulating, and hoarding time, as well as, exalting productivity and the desire for speed.

Patience can be cultivated by remembering our relationship with God, including God’s patience with us in those times we were stumbling through life trying to determine our place in God’s redemptive story.

We also cultivate patience by thinking of time differently––as a gift instead of a commodity.

Demonstrating patience helps support the strength of leadership as others are led to see the working of God through Christ in their lives.

Observant

Being observant is essential in leadership. The power of observation is deeply connected to its definition.

Alert: When leaders are alert, they are quick to notice anything unusual or potentially dangerous.

Watchful: Leaders who are carefully watching others and the situation lead out of concern.

Aware: When there is a knowledge or perception of a situation or fact, leaders are aware.

Attentive: To be attentive, leaders must pay close attention to someone or something.

The basis for successful leadership is found in being observant, and this kind of leadership is not easy. It requires diligence, time, patience, and great love.

Test of Character

John W. Holt, Jr. said, “The true test of character is not how much we know how to do, but how we behave when we don’t know what to do.”

Testing one’s character is powerful and needed.

The main thought here is specifically about how leaders behave when they don’t know what to do.

The qualities of patience, understanding, thoughtful reflection, and being cautious are important. Rashly made decisions without the proper foundation often result in serious consequences which could be avoided.

Learning to seek the counsel of others who have walked the same paths can open leaders up to greater wisdom, possible alternatives, and new angles of consideration.

Are You Ready?

Procrastination can be destructive in a leader’s life.

We often convince ourselves we are not quite ready, and so we wait…and wait.

I appreciate a statement from Lemony Snicket, ”If we wait until we’re ready, we’ll be waiting for the rest of our lives.”

If we decide to wait, what exactly will it take for us to get ready? More money or education? Greater opportunity? Time?

How will we know if we are ready?

There are times when patience is a virtue, times when waiting a little longer is beneficial. However, if we wait until we are ready, we may never be ready.

Patient Leaders

Successful leadership does not consist of leading people the same way, because people are not the same.

Timber Hawkeye says, ”Flowers only bloom when they are ready. People are the same way. You cannot rush or force them open just because you think it’s time. Be patient.”

People learn and advance differently. Some advance quickly, while others learn more slowly. An effort to rush or force them when and where they are not ready only creates frustration for everyone.

While most everyone desires patience… right now, the ability to demonstrate patience in the development of others is a treasured quality for leaders.

Enduring Leaders

Endurance is often challenging. To endure involves bearing up under the load, far more than being patient.

While we are to be patient, to endure takes us to a level that challenges our ability to hold on, and hold on longer than we can imagine.

What will help us endure these challenges?

Remember, “If God brings us to it, He will see us through it.”

God is faithful. He is with us and He is for us (Rom. 8:31-39)!

No matter how difficult, do not forget that challenges are temporary.

With proper perspective we can endure, especially knowing our God is in control.

Problems and Patience

All leaders face problems. Problems are not new, but how we deal with them makes a major difference.

James Merritt writes about the necessity of patience in leadership. He wrote, “Problems are not meant to defeat you, depress you, or discourage you. God meant them to develop you.”

If we possessed a more developmental mindset toward problems, we would probably experience an entirely different attitude when they occur.

When problems occur, regardless of the source of the problem, we have an opportunity to evaluate our approach.

The demonstration of patience in these moments may just give us an opportunity to experience divine development.

Empathy

We often fail to recognize that most of what we see in life is biased by who we are: how we were raised, the environment, culture, and hundreds of other areas, rather than reality.

Interestingly enough, how we see things becomes reality to us. Because this is true, we become entrenched in our beliefs to the point of dogma.

No one is exempt, but we need to understand the importance of patience and love when attempting to help others grow.

Leadership requires us to have empathy, the ability to understand and enter another person’s feelings. The more we do so, the greater our influence.

Ambition

Our ambition must have a spiritual focus, pleasing the Lord!

When our leadership is about pleasing the Lord it changes our approach to every area of life.

Relationships within our families are shaped by Biblical principles.

Our conduct on the job is influenced by a God-fearing attitude.

Approaching people outside of Christ is filled with a greater level of patience and compassion.

Beyond everything else, we worship with a greater understanding of our sovereign God.

When our leadership is driven by this kind of ambition the church will grow in the grace and knowledge of our Savior.

Moses

God claimed Moses to be the meekest man on earth.

Recognizing his willingness to follow the advice of Jethro, preserving his mental and physical faculties, we find a great Bible leader.

However, Moses is an example of a great Bible leader because he started like most of us, denying God’s power to use him to lead His people. When Moses finally submitted himself to God’s authority and direction, we find Moses becoming what God needed.

He had flaws, required patience, and he had to learned that God must be treated as holy.

The lesson to learn is how God can use us with our flaws and imperfections.