Tag: Paul

Mentoring…part 3

A 2013 documentary, “Inside Chipotle,” highlighted a very important area regarding leadership. Managers in the company are promoted on the basis of how they develop leaders among their employees.

The concept of leaders developing leaders is a highly known principle in most all leadership models.

How amazing would it be for spiritual leaders to consider developing other leaders?

Jesus demonstrated this in developing the apostles for the task of evangelizing the world.

Paul instructs older men to set an example of a godly life and for older women to teach younger women matters of the home.

We influence others everyday. Let us mentor them to lead.

Love

One of the greatest needs in our world and one of the greatest challenges involves love.

As Christians who grow and nurture our relationship with God we can easily lose sight of our past life, a time when we were described as helpless, ungodly, sinners, and enemies. In this condition, Paul says God demonstrates His love toward us.

Paul did not say demonstrated, as in past tense. The word is present active showing that God demonstrates His love now and it continues with no thought of coming to an end.

To lead others to the love of God, we must demonstrate the nature of God’s love.

Ambitious Leadership

Defining ambition is not difficult. The difficulty arises when we consider where our ambition lies.

Is our ambition driven by financial security, power, or authority?

Would our ambition be characterized by selfish and physical priorities, or a spiritual focus?

Paul identified an ambition that was spiritually and eternally developed, because we make it our ambition to please the Lord.

When our leadership is driven to please the Lord it changes our approach to every area of life, and the church will grow in the grace and knowledge of our Savior.

Forgiveness

Forgiveness is unique, meaning to “send away.” When God forgives, He sends our sin away. As David wrote, “As far as the east is from the west, so far has He removed our transgressions from us” (Ps. 103:12).

While the arsenal needed to get through this life includes listening to God (study) and speaking with God (prayer), the promise of His strength keeps us focused. This is how we learn contentment, as Paul identified, “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me” (Phil. 4:13).

When leaders learn to practice the difficult task of forgiveness, their ability to influence others increases.

People-Centric

Our world is geared to satisfy self. A quick Google search or a tour through Amazon’s book selection reveals the magnitude of the problem. Book titles such as, Love Yourself, Celebrate Yourself, Self-Esteem: You’re Better Than You Think, and The Art of Learning to Love Yourself highlight the challenge before us.

Leaders must be people-centric, others-centered, if they desire true fulfillment. Even more interesting is the fact that the entire concept is biblical.

Jesus explicitly identifies the first step to discipleship as one of denying self (Lk. 9:23), and Paul caps off the thought with regarding others as more important than self (Phil. 2:3-4).

Someday

Janet Dailey is credited with saying, “Someday is not a day of the week.”

When we consider the urgency of leadership within the church today, one has to wonder if years ago the thought was, “Someday I will lead.”

Apathy and indifference has influenced the church to the point we now have a generation that lacks the desire to lead.

Where is the passion that drives us to excel as Paul instructed? What happened to the desire to improve who we are in order to help others grow?

The time is NOW! We must not delay to meet the urgency of the situation.

A Great Responsibility

When Paul wrote Timothy, he used an interesting word translated entrust. The idea was to take what was entrusted to him and entrust it to others.

At the root of this word is the concept of placing before or into the hand of another. It represents responsibility. Whatever was placed into the hand carried a responsibility of placing into the hand of someone else that it might be perpetuated into the future.

When we apply the concept to leadership, this principle indicates a succession that leaders must consider for the future. How seriously do we take this responsibility?

Example

The only time when Jesus said, “I gave you an example,” is in John 13 where He emphasized the need to be a servant, and the mark of our discipleship comes from the way we treat one another.

Paul encouraged Christians to follow his example (1 Co. 11:1). He told Timothy to be an example of the believers in speech, conduct, love, faith and purity (1 Tim. 4:12). The world needs Christians to be an example in marriage and parenting, in ethical business conduct, and being a good neighbor.

We can provide no greater gift in leading others to Christ than setting a good example.

Leading With Love

One of the greatest needs in our world and yet so challenging involves love.

God loves us for who we are and where we are, unconditionally. Unconditionally is where the difficulty begins.

Paul told the church in Rome that God “demonstrates His love toward us.” The love God demonstrated in the past benefits us now and there is no assessment of it ever ending.

To lead others to the love of God, we must demonstrate the nature of God’s love to them.

We even love those who are not always easy to love. If God continues to love us in this way, we must do the same toward others.

Paul…Part 3

Three more qualities stand out as it relates to Paul’s leadership.

Confident: Paul’s confidence was not based on who he was, but Jesus and what Christ had done for Him.

Disciplined: Paul spoke about discipline to ensure the message of the gospel aligned perfectly with the example of his life.

Faithful: Christ considered Paul faithful. Although his past was an example of blasphemy, persecution, and violence toward the church, the Lord saw something greater.

Paul exemplifies many qualities needed for leadership. If we emulate them, God will use us in powerful ways to make a difference.