Tag: Peter

Missional Leaders

Being prepared is foundational to influence. When challenged or questioned, we must be ready.

Peter reminds Christians to always be ready (1 Pe. 3:15). Ask yourself, “Am I ready?

Preparation is connected to a few key principles.

1. Understand the urgency of the situation. Preparation can make the difference.
2. Recognize that answers are found in the Bible. God provided a tool to prepare us. Know it!
3. Ask others for assistance. The wisdom of others can improve who we are and what we do.

Are you ready? A few simple steps will help you get there.

Lead Like Jesus

Peter clearly points out that Jesus suffered, leaving an example to follow in His steps.

Peter’s first letter is one that acknowledges the need for Christians to prepare for suffering, not to be surprised when suffering occurs, and to know that when they suffer as Christians they are blessed.

Would we think differently about the words of the song, “Oh To Be Like Thee,” if we knew that we were asking to suffer as Jesus suffered?

We often hear, “Lead like Jesus.” Will our leadership involve suffering for the cause of the Lord? Are we willing to lead like Him?

Imitating Christ

Scripture instructs us to be an imitator of Christ. Peter identifies that Jesus left an example that we should walk in His steps.

What exactly does that mean? In context, Peter’s statement to Christians related to suffering.

Hopefully, we possess a conviction to walk in His steps, even when suffering.

Our prayer is that we draw closer to our God, understand more fully the example left for us to follow, and then live our life as a reflection of His example.

Where will it take us? If we follow it through, we might just find an amazing path before us.

A Spiritual Guide…

Where do followers go when they meet with difficult challenges?

Where would leaders have them go when needs outweigh the balances of monetary ability?

Spiritual leaders will always face questions from those who follow. 

Jesus once asked the apostles if they were going to walk away, to which Peter responded, “Lord, to whom shall we go? You have the words of eternal life” (Jn. 6:68).

When followers turn to leaders, will they receive words of eternal life? Will they learn how to get through life and gain eternity?

Where else can they go if not to spiritual leaders who desire to guide them to know God and a home in heaven?

Work Worth Finishing…

Is our current project worth finishing? Will it make a difference in the lives of others?

When leading others there are some things worth achieving in our leadership. Consider the following.

Andrew: He was responsible for bringing Peter to Jesus. For leaders, bringing others to Jesus is a task worth achieving.

Barnabas: His name means “son of encouragement.” Providing encouragement to others is one of the greatest leadership achievements.

Timothy: He taught those who were faithful to teach others. Such activity would ensure salvation for everyone involved.

If we can achieve the activity of these individuals, our leadership will make a difference.

SALT Fun Fact #6

“Michelangelo’s ‘Last Supper,’ shows Judas knocking over a salt shaker, which is meant to symbolize an act of the devil (the reason some throw salt over the shoulder…to blind the devil). When good leadership opportunities are wasted, the devil has his way with people. Great leaders stand over the shoulders of others to guide, train, and warn against Satan’s traps.” Wayne Roberts

The thought here does not encourage nor support “lording” over others. This was condemned by Jesus and Peter. Leaders must learn to distinguish between lording over others and the process of guiding, training, and warning against Satan’s traps.