Tag: Pride

NO!

Two simple letters, but so hard to use. The result tends to leave a leader overloaded, panic stricken, and stressed out.

Why does this happen? Here are a few possibilities.

Pride: The issue here is the mindset that no one else has the ability to do the job as good as “I” can do it.

Selfishness: When leaders become so focused on their own agenda or desires, saying “yes” creates a busy appearance and pads the ego.

Apathy: When leaders are no longer concerned about others, they might as well say yes because it does not matter whether they get to it or not.

Interdependency

Rarely do leaders consider the interdependency of relationships. These are relationships where people are dependent on each other.

Our culture focuses on independence, a make it on your own mentality. Pride often hinders us from ever seeking or asking for help from anyone else.

The other side of the coin is one where we become dependent on someone else without contributing to the relationship ourselves.

When we take a learning posture and realize others can teach, guide, and offer something to help us in our role as leaders, we begin to fulfill an interdependency that will strengthen our ability to lead.

Admitting Wrong

Our culture is proud. To some degree, this is true in all countries. Perhaps it is human nature. The concept of being wrong is not a pleasant or acceptable situation for most.

We do not want to admit or acknowledge we were wrong. The older we get the more difficult it is to admit.

Marvin Williams tells us, “There is no better test of a man’s integrity than his behavior when he is wrong.”

Rare is the leader who, when faced with the reality of being wrong, has the integrity to admit they were wrong, accept the consequences, learn from it, and correct the situation.

Gentleness…

Gentleness provides a contrast to pride and power. Humility and lowliness are critical components of this fruit.

The other-directed nature of gentleness stands in opposition to those who foster aggression, self-promotion, and who desire positions of power.

We cultivate gentleness by altering our posture through prayer, learning to yield, and spending time with those of “no account.”

Praying for those who wrong or anger us increases the difficulty of speaking harshly to or about them.

Humility demonstrates the power to yield our will to others.

Extending hospitality to those without a worldly status or position of power also demonstrates gentleness.

Leaders and Debating…

People seem to love debating. They love to debate about politics, religion, personal opinions, various convictions, and current events.

We should not be surprised; it seems to have been around for centuries of time. Socrates said, “When the debate is lost, slander becomes the tool of the loser.”

When pride grows, we no longer debate, but seek ways to slander our opponent in order to win.

Spiritual leaders lose credibility when they willingly attack and slander someone instead of presenting truth in love. 

We tend to think we have a responsibility to expose others for their beliefs, when in reality we need to speak the truth of God’s word.