Tag: Priorities

Check This Out

Have you ever heard someone say, “Check this out?” In other words, something is exciting, interesting, or just bizarre enough it is worth our time and attention.

How do we check out our leadership?

1) Do a character audit. Examine those core values and how they align with the practices of our daily life. If there are areas that don’t measure up, commit to change them.

2) Ask those who are close, including family, what they see as the priority in our life. Generally, the way we see ourselves is not how others see us, and their perspective needs to be heard if we are to develop our leadership.

Check it Out!

Christian Leaders

While people often think leaders are a rare breed, leadership needs those who are a rare breed because they are Christians.

The priorities established by Christian leaders contribute to a breed of leaders that know who they are and where they are going.

The character demonstrated by Christian leaders sets them apart as a rare breed influencing others toward a heavenly goal.

The inspiration promoted by Christians leaders becomes the lifeblood for exciting followers to take their faith into the lives of others.

Christian leaders are a rare breed, and with the right priorities, character, and inspiration, the future is incredibly bright.

Priorities

How often do we become so overloaded or over-committed the stress is overwhelming?

We are consumed with thinking about what should be done tomorrow, next week, next month, or even next year. We feel overwhelmed and accomplish nothing, as if we do not know where to start. The key is examining what “has” to be done today and prioritizing those matters, then getting to work.

Dan Millman suggests, “We can do anything, but we can’t do everything… at least not at the same time. So think of your priorities not in terms of what activities you do, but when you do them. Timing is everything.”

The Speed of Leadership

Life often goes by at “break-neck” speed and we struggle to keep up. Occasionally, a slower pace would be nice.

Life, however, is not always as easily planned as we might like.

Such is true in leadership. There will be days we accelerate the pace to accomplish certain tasks or reach specific goals. Other days move us to slow everything down.

The key is to prioritize what must be done today, be flexible – fast or slow, never hesitate to ask for help when needed, and trust in God’s providence.

It is amazing how and where God is working.

Leading in the Present…

David wrote, “This is the day the Lord has made; let us be glad and rejoice in it.”

What exactly does today provide for our leadership?

Time to reflect on yesterday and make necessary changes.
Time to focus on our priorities, realizing we may only have today.
Time to prepare for potential challenges ahead.
Time to walk through God-given doors of opportunity.
Time to share the depth of our love with others.

Today is the day. Do not wait any longer. Be wise with the precious time God has placed before us.

Leadership Ambition…

Ambition involves a desire to achieve something, usually requiring determination and hard work.

The difficulty arises when we consider where our ambition lies.

Are we ambitious to achieve financial security?

Is our ambition driven by power and authority?

Would our ambition be characterized by selfish and physical priorities?

Or, can we say our ambition is motivated by a spiritual focus?

When our leadership is driven by the kind of ambition that seeks to please the Lord, the church will grow in the grace and knowledge of our Savior.

Project Leadership…

When is the best time to start and complete a project?
Why is this project important and what will it cost?
How will the project benefit others?
When will we make time to work on the project?
Who knows about the project and how do others learn about it?
What is required to maintain enthusiasm for the project?
Can the project potentially distract us from important matters in life?

Our projects can help or hinder our leadership. If we are not asking the right questions, we may be unaware of how they affect our relationship with others.