Tag: Scripture

Redirecting Our Focus…

We are all molded by the events of the past, whether teaching, experience, or influence. Each of these take on both a positive and negative trait.

Paul’s family heritage, academic credentials, knowledge of scripture, and zealous attack against the church left a mark he did not forget from his past.

However, he did not allow the past to dictate the direction of his future. Paul had a new spiritual focus.

Leaders must learn from the past in order to prevent repeating areas that hinder our Christian influence.

The challenges of yesterday are past. We need to redirect our attention toward a spiritual future.

Knowing God…

Biblical leadership involves qualities, traits, virtues, and principles that guide character formation. As such, a biblical leader is one who desires to know God.

Scripture is filled with passages that emphasize the need to know God. Jesus said eternal life is aligned with knowing God and the One who was sent by Him.

Paul counted everything as loss for the “surpassing value of knowing Christ Jesus” (Phil. 3:8). His heritage, material possessions, academic achievement, and religious position were worthless when laid alongside this knowledge.

Biblical leaders are driven by a passion to grow in the grace and knowledge of the Lord.

Goodness…

Goodness is a fruit to be cultivated in the midst of a self-help culture. Three thoughts introduce the idea of goodness.

One, the consistent testimony in scripture that God alone is unequivocally good.

Two, if sin makes us incapable of goodness apart from God, as those created in His image, we possess the potential for goodness.

Three, knowing what counts for good can only be determined under the guidance of God’s Spirit.

We cultivate goodness by naming our sin, attending to God’s word, and imitation.

When leaders are characterized by goodness, self-awareness, upward attention, and outward activity cultivate this fruit.

Joy…

Joy exceeds simple pleasure. Kenneson claims joy is the byproduct of our desire for something more outward.

The other-directedness nature of joy shows why it is so closely connected to love. If love be related to God’s grace, the gift exemplifies a significance between these two Greek words: charis (grace) and chara (joy).

Scripture connects suffering with joy, and “living joyfully despite persecution and affliction does not require one to deny the reality of suffering or pain” (63).

We cultivate joy when we rejoice in the opportunity to worship God, nurture contentment, and learn to enjoy children.

This is only the beginning.

Pleasing Everyone…

An effort to please everyone is doomed to fail. Marco Rubio said, “We live in a society obsessed with public opinion. But leadership has never been about popularity.”

Sadly, the adage about the “squeaky wheel” is true. Those who complain the most and loudest tend to get action.

The church needs leaders who… 1) examine scripture to ensure decisions are biblical, 2) do not follow the flow of modern popularity, 3) never rush a decision, but do not hesitate between two opinions either, 4) make the decision, 5) remember, not every decision will please everyone.

The responsibility of decisive leadership is crucial to the future.

A Refuge for Leaders…

God is our strength and refuge. As such, He is an ever present help when we face trouble.

When the trouble is one of loss: a friend, family member, position, possession, or health, God is our help, but where does this help come from?

From His word. Throughout scripture we find strength, comfort and guidance.
Through prayer. Scripture instructs us to cast all our cares upon Him, because He cares.
From others. One of the best ways leadership is demonstrated is helping those in need.

We receive a great peace from God when we apply these areas during times of trouble.

A Motive To Lead…

People lead for different reasons. At times, the situation (crisis) demands someone lead.

However, selfish ambition motivates far too many. The desire to personally benefit from a position of power is appealing in both the secular and spiritual arena. 

When people lead with the right motives, the result is powerful.

Developing this motive consists of three components.

1) Personal and familial relationship with Christ. 
2) Understanding scripture, both the milk and meat of God’s word.
3) Compassion for people’s eternal condition, saved and lost.

These help us check and develop the motive godly leaders should possess.