Tag: SIBI

Tone, Pace, and Volume

I once asked a group of men about how to improve communication as leaders. While I received several responses, one that resonated well with me involved three words: Tone, Pace, and Volume.

The tone we use to communicate impacts the attitude with which our message is received.

The pace of our communication determines the level in which it is understood.

The volume we use to communicate influences how well the message is accepted.

It is worth the time and effort to ensure that the tone, pace, and volume used to communicate our message is appropriate for positive reception, understanding, and acceptance.

Who, How, and Why

Three significant questions surface in your leadership.

First, “Who are you trying to reach?” Churches often talk about trying to reach their communities, but rarely are they willing to take the necessary steps to do so. The answer here makes a difference in the direction and steps taken in the next question.

Second, “How will you reach them?” It may take specific marketing technique, extra time in the community, developing stronger relationships, financial means, or additional people. You must be willing to do whatever it takes.

Third, and perhaps most importantly, “Why are you doing this?” If you can’t answer this question with certainty and clarity, people will not follow long.

Highlight Reel Leadership

While watching ESPN recently, I noticed the negative way commentators used the highlights of a specific NBA player. They only showed the mistakes he made over the last few months. The intent was to question his ability to play at the needed level.

I’ve seen enough highlight clips to know it works both ways. Most often, commentators highlight the incredible plays from an athletes career to showcase their ability.

It made me wonder about leadership. When people look at our lives and replay the highlights, do they showcase the amazing ways we’ve influenced others for good, or do they only show the negative?

We must live in a way to showcase the positive changes our leadership makes.

Benefits of Failure

What or who determines failure? Why is failure seen as negative? How can leaders learn and improve their leadership?

Recognize failure is inevitable. No matter who you are failure takes place.

Acknowledge and take responsibility. Do not ignore, deny, or cast blame when failure occurs.

Remember the words of Winston Churchill, “Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.”

Do not hesitate to act. Waiting to act creates a perception of apathy.

Learn from failure and make changes to prevent the same mistakes.

Work to build a series of successful events or programs to reassure the strength of the leadership.

Leading with Joy

Stress usually saps the joy right out of most decision making. The challenges leaders face become foundational reasons why many choose not to lead.

As long as leaders spend their time dealing with conflict resolution, personality differences, and resource management, then the emotional depletion levels will exceed the ability and desire to continue.

There is a joy in leading and there are positive areas to support the future development and growth of any organization. When leadership receives encouragement to create, innovate, initiate, and motivate, the possibilities are endless for success.

The combination of a vision, goals, and plans, coupled with the authority to lead excites joy in leading.

NO!

Two simple letters, but so hard to use. The result tends to leave a leader overloaded, panic stricken, and stressed out.

Why does this happen? Here are a few possibilities.

Pride: The issue here is the mindset that no one else has the ability to do the job as good as “I” can do it.

Selfishness: When leaders become so focused on their own agenda or desires, saying “yes” creates a busy appearance and pads the ego.

Apathy: When leaders are no longer concerned about others, they might as well say yes because it does not matter whether they get to it or not.

Powerful Communication

How can leaders ensure their message is understood?

Have a clear understanding of the past, present, and future. How did you get here? Where are you now? What direction are you headed?

Prepare a strong defense as to why you are communicating this specific message at this specific time.

Plan how the destination will be reached and communicate it often to ensure no one forgets.

Implement a confirmation brief, which means you ask others to explain what they heard you say.

It takes time and effective communication to get everyone on the same page.

Being the Right Leader

How many times has it been said in relationships, “If only I could find the right person?”

Gloria Steinem once said, “Far too many people are looking for the right person, instead of trying to be the right person.”

If not careful, we can spend all our time searching for the right person, when all we can do is focus on being the right person.

We should focus our life on being the right person and allow that pursuit to direct every attitude, decision, action, and word.

When it does, we will discover the right people will find us.

Making a Difference

Italian TV dinner, Fazoli’s, Macaroni Grill, Massimino’s Cucina Italiana: There is a difference.

Community College, State University, Harvard, Oxford: There is a difference.

Regardless of where we eat, receive our education, or worship, we all know there is a difference.

The same is true in leadership. We see it on every front politically, corporately, educationally, and spiritually. There is a difference.

When it comes to spiritual leadership, are we really making a difference? Have we become complacent, apathetic, or indifferent?

Let us provide the leadership needed today for a better tomorrow and eternity because, in the end, it makes all the difference.

Balance

Balance is almost a forgotten term by many in our world today.

The cultural challenges with balance are weighed in the extremism of our society. A quick glance through Facebook posts or any social media outlet reveals the incredible extremes that exist.

Worse still is the fact that extremism has been carried over into the church. The thought of balance may be mentioned, but rarely applied.

The use of labels such as “left” or “right,” “conservative” or “liberal” indicate how we lack balance.

Until leaders get a solid grasp on the art of balance, unity may not occur.