Tag: Spiritual

Dependence on God…

On the heels of July 4th, here are a couple of thoughts.

Our world continually fights for independence. 

On an international level, countries strive to achieve their freedom. They want to stand on their own, make their own way, establish their own direction.

On a professional level, the business world demonstrates similar areas as individuals and companies work for financial liberty.

On a personal level, if not careful, we train our children to do the same. We urge them to grow up and learn how to make it on their own.

From a spiritual perspective, we need to teach a greater dependence on God and let Him take care of the rest.

Source of Leadership…

Think about the value of a source.

Finding a source for pure water can mean life to a community. Acquiring a source for financial stability secures the future.

We would also agree that a source for salvation changes the eternal destiny of the world. 

Thankfully, God has provided a plan through which Jesus became the source of eternal salvation to all those who obey Him.

As leaders, are we a source through which people obtain God’s grace?

Are we a source for others to grow spiritually?

Let us pray that more see the need to stand in the fight against the spiritual forces of darkness and be a source of light.

Remembering Our Leadership…

We do not have the space to explore all the ways our mind works, or how much of the brain remains untapped.

It is fascinating just to think about the ability we have to remember. Spiritual leaders must consider that people remember what they see longer than what they hear. Therefore, how will our leadership be remembered?

Will it be remembered for our words or actions?
Will it be remembered for being a servant?

Leadership illuminates our lives and, sadly, our lives are lived under a microscope. 

Before we speak or act, it is worth the time to consider how we want our leadership will be remembered.

More to Leadership…

We have all heard the offer for a product followed up with, “But wait, there’s more.” At this point the offer is usually doubled.

We always find a great deal associated with leadership, “But wait, there’s more.” 

Leadership is more than power.
Leadership is more than position.
Leadership is more than a title.
Leadership is more than influence.

There will always be more regarding spiritual leadership. If we approach the task with humility and love, we can realize growth in the church and bring glory to our God.

But wait, there’s more! 

If we act now, more souls will enjoy the beauty of heaven. Think Souls!

Positional Leadership…

One of the great myths of leadership is the positional myth, i.e. “I cannot lead unless I have a position, or once I have a position then I will be able to lead.”

While we do not have to have a position to lead, this position comes with a responsibility. Spiritual leaders are positioned with a responsibility, a responsibility to help others…

…understand there is hope for the future.
…reach their full potential in spiritual maturity.
…obtain their eternal inheritance.

Several years ago, I heard this equation: ability + opportunity = responsibility. After some thought, doesn’t it sound like a good position?

Ulterior Motives…

The motive behind our words and actions is always critical to the success of leadership.

The idea of an ulterior motive indicates a hidden agenda that goes beyond the obvious or stated. The difficulty that often accompanies an ulterior motive is being able to prove the motive. We tend to make accusations about the motives of others because we assume, based on words and actions, the individual has a hidden agenda.

This may or may not be true. We cannot always know the motive of others, but we do know our own. 

True spiritual leadership will demonstrate a transparency supported by the word of God. Therefore, we should lead others openly, promoting a pure and sincere motive.

Crossroads of Leadership…

Crossroads is a classic written by Robert Johnson and performed by numerous artists.

Several have tried to explain the meaning of this song. The most revealing involves Johnson’s struggle with loneliness, especially connected to the desperation of finding his way home from an unfamiliar place.

Leadership can certainly be a lonely place and it can also take us into unfamiliar places where we desperately seek our way home.

The result brings us to a crossroads, where we question our leadership. We face challenging decisions.

Spiritually, we constantly face crossroads. The decisions we make in those moments determine salvation or condemnation. Our leadership must serve to help others at the crossroads make the right decisions and find their way home.