Tag: Sunset

Leaders in Progress

When we think of progress, we often think of a forward movement toward a specific destination. However, we must also think in terms that can be measured.

One of the challenges leaders face in making progress is the result of thinking qualitative, rather than quantitative. We have a vague idea, but can’t really determine if we are making progress or not.

Leaders must establish short- and long-term goals that enable everyone to see progress. Here is where we ignite enthusiasm and greater involvement follows.

Get out of the status quo rut and take the initiative to lead from the front.

Leading Technology

Be familiar with newer and emerging technologies.

Leadership (being a great leader) is not contingent on using or keeping up with emerging technology. Many leaders from the past and many in the future may never use technology.

However, we cannot deny the incredible opportunities that technology presents in the development of our leadership.

Tools for training, mentoring, guidance, and encouragement are available to everyone.

If we have the opportunity to utilize the tools of technology to grow in our leadership and influence thousands, if not millions more, will God not hold us accountable for such?

Committed Leaders

Never commit to things you cannot do.

Oddly enough, material does exist that emphasizes the fake-it-until-you-make-it approach.

We should always be willing to grow and improve by moving outside our comfort zone, but the idea here involves areas we know we cannot do. For example, when someone invites us to dinner and we know we cannot make it, instead of saying no, we delay the inevitable by saying “maybe.”

Jesus taught the need for our yes to mean yes, and our no, no. Jesus added that anything beyond these is of evil.

It is critical to our leadership to be a person of our word.

Trust

Leaders need to demonstrate trust in others.

One of the great challenges in leadership is a micromanaging style of leading. When leaders give someone a task or job to accomplish, there should be a level of trust that allows them to complete the work.

Standing over someone to guide and counsel every detail in their actions or correct each imperfection communicates a lack of trust.

If the individual is not trustworthy, then they should not be given the job. If they are trustworthy, then leaders must demonstrate trust by equipping others with the tools needed for the task and let them go to work.

An Example To Follow

Always set an example others can emulate. How do we want others to behave at work, home, or in the church? We must model that behavior first.

The idea of expecting others to behave in ways we are unwilling to do ourselves is the greatest form of hypocrisy and a one-way ticket to losing credibility. Our conduct is all inclusive. We should never compartmentalize our lives into the way we behave on the job, at home, in the neighborhood, and around Christians. A disciple of Christ always lives a Christlike life 24-7-365.

Let us all resolve to provide an example worthy of others to follow.

Rise Above

We are all familiar with phrases like, “Don’t sweat the small stuff” or “When life gives you lemons, make lemonade.” John Burroughs said it this way, “Rise above the little things.”

Jesus also emphasized this thought with a bit of a twist when He taught us not to worry about food, drink, or clothing, but to seek first God’s kingdom and His righteousness (Mt. 6:25-33).

The challenge before leaders is determining the difference between the big and little things. When we understand the matters that are trivial, we can implement ways to rise above them and focus on matters of greater significance.

Four Steps

Reflection, remembrance, consideration, and gratitude are words all leaders should know.

1) Now is the best opportunity to reflect on how we started, where we are now, and what steps brought us here.

2) While reflecting on our accomplishments, remember that God placed us in this position at this time. Let us be faithful.

3) We need to consider the lessons learned. We should also consider those involved in helping us reach this point.

4) Of all the steps, none holds more significance than gratitude. We need a thankful heart that expresses an understanding that where we are is because God has placed us here. Let us honor Him!

Leadership Resolve

Numerous ideas play into who we are and what we do, but generally speaking, a resolution involves an improvement in some area of life. At times, these improvements better our personal lives and sometimes they improve the lives of others.

Leaders focus on resolutions that include a need to improve who they are, but to also influence others in ways that improve their lives.

Let us all be encouraged to use this opportunity to consider how we can make resolutions that expand our leadership in ways that influence ways to improve life now and eternally.

Leading with Respect

Regardless of the environment or situation, people want leaders who respect and value how they contribute to the achievement of organizational goals.

Few areas, however, gain respect more quickly than by showing respect to and for others. A couple of suggestions include: 1) attention given to work accomplished, 2) time to build relationships, 3) accepting responsibility and giving accountability, 4) transparency, and 5) trust.

Leaders who strive to gain, earn, and achieve respect lead with heart. They touch the lives of those who follow and change the power of teamwork in the growth of any organization.

A Little Each Day

The power of improving a little each day cannot be overstated. John Wooden expressed this idea by saying, “When you improve a little each day, eventually big things occur. When you improve conditioning a little each day, eventually you have a big improvement in conditioning. Not tomorrow, not the next day, but eventually a big gain is made. Don’t look for the big, quick improvement. Seek the small improvement one day at a time. That’s the only way it happens — and when it happens, it lasts.”

Imagine how much more could be accomplished and how enduring when leaders work on developing their leadership a little each day.