Category: saltJournal

Bob’s daily blog of leadership points.

A Conveying Leader

Conveyance involves the action of making an idea, feeling, or impression known or understandable to someone.

The bottom line is communication. Leaders must be good communicators. They know the vision, mission, and values that drive the organization.

When the story of God’s mission unfolds in the life of Jesus, the heart of His vision, mission, and values conveys hope with eternal ramifications.

It changed the lives of 3,000 people on the day of Pentecost.
Numerous disciples / apostles suffered and died to see others obey it.
The message has the same power to save two thousand years later.

Let us lead with conveyance.

Refuse to Give Up

Numerous people speak about persistence, perseverance, and the stick-to-itive mindset connected to success.

The ability to never quit, even in the face of challenge, difficulty, or hardship is rare and needed in the home, world, and church.

My oldest son says, “It’s amazing what happens when you REFUSE to give up. Failure eventually gives up on you.”

Of all people, leaders must possess that quality of grit that eliminates the possibility of failure.

Developing a fighting spirit in face of adversity will strengthen our leadership and encourage others to address their own challenges with the same vim and vigor.

Lead Like Jesus

Peter clearly points out that Jesus suffered, leaving an example to follow in His steps.

Peter’s first letter is one that acknowledges the need for Christians to prepare for suffering, not to be surprised when suffering occurs, and to know that when they suffer as Christians they are blessed.

Would we think differently about the words of the song, “Oh To Be Like Thee,” if we knew that we were asking to suffer as Jesus suffered?

We often hear, “Lead like Jesus.” Will our leadership involve suffering for the cause of the Lord? Are we willing to lead like Him?

Don’t Quit

Success and failure are subjective terms. How we define and determine success or failure depends largely on our perspective.

Dr. Richard Bandler helps with this perspective by saying, “Failure means you’ve stopped. So don’t stop. Keep at it. The more you move in the right direction towards success, the better you’ll feel. Every day work on making new positive habits second nature — make them automatic.”

While it is not complicated, leaders will go far by learning that success is based on this simple principle – Don’t Quit!

Leading into Tomorrow

More than a few people struggle with past mistakes. Guilt makes us wish we could return to the past and make corrections, even though we know it is impossible.

The challenge is overcoming the desire to live in the past and not allowing the mistakes of the past to dictate our future.

We must learn from the past and realize that our future is determined by the choices we make today to shape a better tomorrow.

If we make decisions built on a spiritual foundation, the direction of tomorrow is one that ensures a future with eternal significance.

Leadership and Character

I have often discussed the necessity of character when talking about leadership. The primarily quality of a leader’s character is trust.

Leaders must certainly be worthy of the trust placed in them by those who follow.

I appreciate Rory Vaden’s thought, “In easy times, personality is revealed. In hard times, your character is revealed.”

The last year delivered some pretty hard times for leaders in the church. Now, more than ever, the church needs leaders who have the kind of character that is worthy of trust.

Can God trust us to lead in this way?

True Leadership

In a recent podcast, Patrick Lencioni talked about leadership with an interesting twist. He said, “There is no such thing as ‘servant leadership.’ If you are a leader, you are a servant.”

Of course, the idea speaks to many facets of leading. Some serve themselves, and others serve the people they lead.

Rory Vaden coined the thought, “If serving is beneath you, then leadership is beyond you.”

Both of these men speak to the heart of what leadership is all about––serving.

We have the example of Jesus. The question really becomes, “Who will we serve in our leadership?”

Timely Advice

Measure twice, cut once.

The lesson behind this advice extends beyond the field of carpentry and medicine. In fact, the application is fitting for most areas of life, especially leadership.

Leadership credibility increases when decisions are based on additional information gained or counsel received indicating the time taken to measure twice.

How different will outcomes be if we take time to investigate before making decisions that compromise our relationship with God and His people?

Measuring twice makes it possible to insure accuracy before making decisions that carry great consequential impact.

Our leadership rests in the balance of this advice.

Evaluation

One of the most significant components of goal setting and achievement is evaluation. Evaluation is a time to reflect, assess, or make a judgment about the amount, number, or value of something.

Once goals are established for any individual or organization, an effective way to determine progress is through evaluation.

Evaluating progress monthly, quarterly, bi-annually, and yearly provides leaders an opportunity to measure the amount of progress, assess necessary changes, implement phases of the plan, and build the confidence of stakeholders in the process.

The profit gained by evaluating each essential part of the plan determines success.

Leading Like Jesus

Jesus was not one to focus His time on the rich, popular, political or religious leaders of the people.

Jesus spent time with the outcast, unwanted, and unlikely of society.

He did not participate in or condone their activities. He worked to influence them and show a better way. He gave them hope.

We must consider who we focus our time on, if we seek to be like Him. This does not mean we shun or avoid the wealthy. We may not always be comfortable with the outcast, unwanted, or unlikely, but history and experience indicate they are the most receptive.