Tag: Compassion

Leading by Priority

Kingdom priority relates to the church Jesus built.

How much priority do we place upon God’s kingdom? When we look at our brothers and sisters in Christ, what priority do they see in that relationship?

When a need exists among our family, do we place an urgency upon that need?

With all the negativity surrounding the church today, where do we rank our response to kingdom priority?

As we read about unity, forgiveness, and demonstrating compassion, how are our priorities seen?

The way we treat people establishes how our priorities are seen and it demonstrates the reach of our influence as leaders.

Compassionate Leaders…

One of the qualities Jesus demonstrated, instrumental in drawing others to Him, was compassion.

Mentioned several times, Jesus was compassionate to both those physically and spiritually in need.

His compassion was more than sympathy about someone else’s distress, it moved Him to act in ways that met the need.

An awareness of pressing needs is an important component, but compassionate leaders seek ways to get involved to help meet those needs.

I pray God will give us all the compassion to be aware of our environment and help meet the needs.

Dealing Out Hope…

After spending several hours contacting numerous shelters to find housing for someone in need, an overwhelming realization of the hopeless condition among our population was apparent.

A compassionate heart quickly recognizes how people can feel so hopeless. A number of explanations may be given as to the cause, but the need for leaders is to provide hope. Napoleon is credited with saying, “leaders are dealers in hope.”

Leaders extend hope by learning to listen and express concern.

Leaders need to offer hope that someone is trustworthy.

Leaders possess a responsibility to demonstrate care by action.

People follow leaders who provide hope.

Self-Aware Leaders…

An amazing inward benefit occurs when we outwardly recognize the pains and struggles of others.

Amyra Mah said it this way, “As I learned to accept myself, I began to relate to people on a deeper level and saw that everyone comes with their own pains and struggles. I learned to appreciate them for their flaws as much as their strengths, which in turn helped me to accept myself more.”

Self-perception benefits leaders with an awareness of their strengths and weaknesses, along with an understanding of how to help others with the same.

The beauty of this discovery results in compassion, sympathy, empathy, and patience.

Compassionate Leaders…

Compassion means “to suffer together,” and no one understood this better than Jesus.

The University of California, Berkley claims that something special exists when compassion characterizes a leader: a feeling of sympathy aroused by another’s suffering and the motivation to relieve the suffering.

The guiding hand of compassion considers the suffering of someone else and acts accordingly.

The compassion of Jesus was represented in several ways. He prayed for them, healed them, fed them, and taught them.

Leaders who follow these guidelines lay a foundation that lasts into eternity.

The Lord, Our Example…

Nearing the end of Psalms we find a poetic passage that highlights several areas about the Lord, declaring why He is worthy to be praised. He is…

Creator of heaven and earth.
Executor of justice for the disadvantaged.
Provider of sustenance for those in need.
Healer of the afflicted.
Exalter of the downtrodden.
Compassionate to the upright.
Protector of strangers.
Supporter of the orphan and widow.
Frustrater of wicked ways.
Ruler of all.

These ten words are laced throughout the Bible and provide strength to the weak, comfort for the discouraged, and protection for the vulnerable.
Leaders understand and practice the same.

A Considerate Leader…

A considerate leader stands out.

They have a heart for others. Leaders are challenged to consider the good intention of others first. We live in a skeptical world. We tend to question the motive or intention of everyone, including those who deserve our greatest trust.

A considerate leader thinks about the needs of others. The needs are hard to recognize when we only experience superficial relationships. Leaders must get below the surface and learn the real need and consider how to provide it.

Consideration should be a part of a leader’s daily walk in relationships. Doing so exemplifies the compassion of great leadership.

A True Leader…

Douglas MacArthur once said, “A true leader has the confidence to stand alone, the courage to make tough decisions, and the compassion to listen to the needs of others. He does not set out to be a leader, but becomes one by the equality of his actions and the integrity of his intent.”

His thought exemplifies four key words that powerfully contribute to leadership.

Confidence – We need confidence in God and our leadership.

Courage – Leaders must demonstrate courage when needed.

Compassion – This Christlike quality should characterize all leaders. 

Equality – Acting with consistency is a key to equality.

Integrity – Few areas are more important than walking with integrity.

Leading in Uncertain Times…

In light of recent events, it seems appropriate to consider how to respond in these uncertain times.

1) Remember every person was created in the image of God. The beauty of this thought should motivate us to reach out with the same compassion God demonstrated toward us.

2) Leadership is about people. We do not lead objects, but people. Until leaders look through the eyes of God and the lens of humanity, this thought will be challenging.

3) How would we want someone to treat us if the roles were reversed? It is difficult in the midst of comfortability to reverse the circumstances and picture the need.

4) The need for salvation overrides any other possible reason for inactivity. Everyone needs Christ and Christ died for everyone!

Let us lead with these in mind.

Confidence, Courage, Compassion – Integrity…

Confidence, courage, and compassion are three of the strongest words in leadership. Douglas MacArthur used these words in this thought, “A true leader has the confidence to stand alone, the courage to make tough decisions, and the compassion to listen to the needs of others. He does not set out to be a leader, but becomes one by the equality of his actions and the integrity of his intent.” 

The last thought powerfully establishes true spiritual leadership – integrity.

If leaders demonstrate the qualities identified and possess the integrity to stand behind them, their leadership will be stronger and point others to the God who gave them this position.