Tag: Focus

Great Leaders

There is no doubt that great leaders need to understand their strengths and weaknesses. They know the areas where they lack ability and how to find the individuals with the strengths to complement those areas.

Great leaders then focus on their strengths. Numerous sources claim that leaders should focus 80% of their time in areas of their strengths and only 20% in areas of weakness.

Focusing on the areas of passion and strength makes a good leader great, and makes a great leader outstanding.

The challenge for us is taking time to examine and evaluate and then make sure we work to reach our greatest potential.

Practice Makes Perfect

Regardless of the application, the idea is to do something over and over again, until perfect.

Olympic athletes are trained from a young age. Drills, routines, and exercises are perfected through hours of practice every day. Their life is dedicated to one purpose: perform perfectly without yielding to pressure.

Doing, action, application, and preparation are all terms associated with practice. This is no longer about theory, but method. Details are worked out for implementation.

Developing the ability to lead is a work in progress.

We need to be focused, dedicated, diligent, and steadfast to the one purpose we are called to do, and lead others in that cause.

Bad Things Happen

No one is immune to the negative, discouraging, or “bad” that occurs, even if we chalk it up to perspective.

However, regardless of perspective, the choice we make when these events happen is what makes the difference.

It has been said, “When something bad happens you have three choices. You can let it define you, let it destroy you, or you can let it strengthen you.” Author Unknown

If difficulties define us, we tend to focus on the drudgery of life.
If difficulties destroy us, then life becomes little more than existence.
If difficulties strengthen us, we are better prepared to help others face the same challenges.

Ambitious Leadership

Defining ambition is not difficult. The difficulty arises when we consider where our ambition lies.

Is our ambition driven by financial security, power, or authority?

Would our ambition be characterized by selfish and physical priorities, or a spiritual focus?

Paul identified an ambition that was spiritually and eternally developed, because we make it our ambition to please the Lord.

When our leadership is driven to please the Lord it changes our approach to every area of life, and the church will grow in the grace and knowledge of our Savior.

Committed Leaders

Occasionally, life will knock us down. We may get knocked down a few more times than we think is our share.

However, are we committed enough to keep getting up no matter how many times we get knocked down?

David McNally claims, “Commitment is the enemy of resistance, for it is the serious promise to press on, to get up, no matter how many times you are knocked down.”

When we are committed we are motivated.
When we are committed we have dedication.
When we are committed we keep our focus.
When we are committed we will stop at nothing.

Whatever It Takes

Is leadership worth it? Are we not better off to let someone else lead? Why not focus on ourselves and our family? Would life not be easier?

Think about how it affects us on a personal level.

Will the long-term results be worth the decision?

If we relinquish the opportunity to lead, will we be content for our children to follow someone or something else?

If brethren decide to follow the path of error, will we accept the consequences for our choice not to lead?

When we weigh it all out, we will probably find that leadership is worth whatever it takes!

Time

From the day we are born to the day we die, we only know time: The time we sleep, the time to get ready for work, the time we spend at work, and the list goes on.

Once time passes, we cannot get it back. It cannot be regained or relived.

When we look at leadership, the value of time takes a sharper focus. From the time we prepare ourselves to lead and influence others to the time we actually spend in building those relationships, every second contains great value.

Let us use our time wisely and make the most of the opportunity to lead with care.

Committed Leaders

How committed are you? David McNally says, “Commitment is the enemy of resistance, for it is the serious promise to press on, to get up, no matter how many times you are knocked down.”

Are we committed enough to get up no matter how many times we get knocked down?

When we are committed we oppose resistance.
When we are committed we are motivated.
When we are committed we have dedication.
When we are committed we keep our focus.
When we are committed we will stop at nothing.

Nothing is more deserving of our commitment than the cause of Jesus.

Balanced Godly Focus

A healthy physical and spiritual approach to life provides a benefit to extending life. The benefit of this extension on a spiritual level is eternal in nature.

Paul phrased it this way, “bodily discipline is only of little profit, but godliness is profitable for all things, since it holds promise for the present life and also for the life to come” (1 Ti. 4:8).

Developing the habits for a godly life require at least three necessities: 1) constant nourishment in healthy and balanced teaching, 2) avoiding a worldly focus, and 3) discipline in godliness.

Focus

When athletes fall short of achieving success, it is generally attributed to a loss in focus.

Leaders cannot afford to lose focus.

Distractions pop up everywhere and usually when we least expect. When distractions arise, we must maintain our focus and not lose sight of our priorities.

Focus is a matter of choice.

People need leaders who help them maintain focus. When our focus is on spiritual life and maturity we help others focus on making the right choices.

Amazingly, when we do so, our focus enables us to handle the distractions with a gracious heart of gratitude.