Tag: Humility

A Winning Combination

Paul identifies the need for Christians to have the same mind that was in Christ (Phi. 2:5), but what is that mind?
Notice the phrases that characterize the mind Paul wants all Christians to possess.

1) Do nothing from selfishness or empty conceit.
2) With humility regard others as more important than yourself.
3) Do not look out for your own interests.
4) Look out for the interest of others.

These four phrases are summed up in the life of Christ: a selfless humility that puts others above self.
Jesus and others is a winning combination for leadership.

Changing the World

Love, humility, and charity, are qualities that increase a leader’s influence.

Eleanor Roosevelt once said, “A mature person is one who does not think only in absolutes, who is able to be objective even when deeply stirred emotionally, who has learned that there is both good and bad in all people and in all things, and who walks humbly and deals charitably with the circumstances of life, knowing that in this world no one is all knowing and therefore all of us need both love and charity.”

The way leaders approach life can change the world. Mrs. Roosevelt’s thoughts provide a good compass for how we bring about that change.

Learning to Lead

A learning leader is open to learn from others, listening to what is said and how it is said. They constantly seek ways to improve who they are, what they are, and how they lead others.

When leaders are open to learn, opportunities abound for obtaining wisdom from others who have a depth of knowledge and experience that exceeds our own.

When leaders approach each situation with a learner’s heart, they demonstrate humility that understands the necessity of being a servant.

No leader will ever know everything, but when leaders are willing to learn they find greater influence.

Ability vs Character…

John Wooden once said, “Ability may get you to the top, but it takes character to keep you there.”

We have all seen people with great ability, college and professional athletes, musicians, and others in the entertainment field. However, ability does not equal character.

Without character, regardless of the ability, it is impossible to have lasting leadership.

Nothing is more significant for spiritual leaders than humility. When spiritual influence is guided by a humble spirit, character naturally follows. When combined with ability, we find the staying power of Christlike leadership.

Seeking the Mind of Christ…

Biblical leaders seek the mind of Christ.

Paul’s letter to Philippi expresses a number of key thoughts in relationship to the mind of Christ.

A Christlike motive, “Do nothing from selfishness or empty conceit.”
A foundational attitude, “With humility of mind.”
A concluding activity, “Regard others as more important than yourselves.”

These three thoughts help us understand what Paul meant by the mind of Christ that must be emulated by all Christians. However, understanding the mind of Christ must be coupled with seeking the mind of Christ.

Biblical leaders are dedicated to understanding the mind of Christ and following His example.

The Heart of Leadership…

What we do for others is where leadership shines. Determining what is in the best interest of others must drive our leadership.

Lewis Carroll summarized it this way, “One of the secrets of life is that all that is really worth the doing is what we do for others.”

We find this common thread throughout the Bible. Reading the book of Philippians quickly reveals the need to have the same mind as Christ, the mind of a humble spirit that regarded others as more important than Himself.

This is the heart of leadership and the future of the church in this world.

Gentleness…

Gentleness provides a contrast to pride and power. Humility and lowliness are critical components of this fruit.

The other-directed nature of gentleness stands in opposition to those who foster aggression, self-promotion, and who desire positions of power.

We cultivate gentleness by altering our posture through prayer, learning to yield, and spending time with those of “no account.”

Praying for those who wrong or anger us increases the difficulty of speaking harshly to or about them.

Humility demonstrates the power to yield our will to others.

Extending hospitality to those without a worldly status or position of power also demonstrates gentleness.

What’s Missing in Leadership?

Mike Maddock, a writer for Forbes online, claims, “Great leaders are open to the fact (and it is a fact) that they are missing something.”

What is missing can range from the most simple of ideas to the most complex of leadership teams.

Let’s start with humility, the kind of humility great leaders need in their leadership.

When humility is part of the equation of leadership, along with an openness to the possibilities, then people follow.

A sense of creativity, innovation, and motivation will provide a stronger morale in achieving short and long-term goals.

We cannot underestimate the power of humility in leadership.

Faith and Leadership…

Great faith is always amazing. Leaders need great faith. They need faith that is so big the only answer is God.

I’ve met a few leaders like this over the years. Recently, I was blessed to meet an elder that shared a moving story about how God showed up in incredible ways to provide a Christian Camp. 

The most impressive aspect of his character was his humility. While others expressed thanks for his role, he never accepted it. He knew only God made it happen. Over and over he said, “It was God’s dream. It was God’s work.” 

When leaders possess the kind of humility to acknowledge the power of God at work in this way, we are privileged to see great faith in action.