Tag: Hypocrisy

Resolving Conflict

The challenges associated with conflict run deep and the resolutions do not come quickly. When conflict arises, what can we do?

1) Embrace the conflict. Conflict allows us the opportunity to learn from and grow through it.
2) Develop consistency. Hypocrisy is destructive, thus a consistent approach is the best start.
3) Listen to all sides. There are at least two sides to every story. Listen completely to both.
4) Respond quickly. Waiting to address conflict produces bitter and incorrect feelings.
5) Invite collective wisdom. Ask others who have faced similar conflict and learn.

This is not an exhaustive list, but with a good start we can find resolution more quickly.

The Principle of Leadership

A principle is defined as a basic generalization that is accepted as true and that can be used as a basis for reasoning or conduct.

We find that principles are foundational to leadership. The world around us measures what they see and hear by the profession of our faith.

If the principles by which we proclaim the gospel do not align with an example evidenced by word and deed, accusations of hypocrisy are rightly made.

When these principles do align, they breathe life into our character.

When this happens, lives change and souls are influenced for the cause of our Lord.

Consistent Leadership…

“Do as I say, not as I do.”

One of the greatest forms of hypocrisy occurs when parents tell their children to live a certain way, yet do not live by the same standard.

I am not saying that parents need to be perfect, regardless of the standard under consideration. However, there needs to be consistency.

Children push limits as close to the line as possible and measure every action by the consistency of parental guidance.

The foundation must be laid here. When we fail, admit it, apologize, and make restitution. Never excuse it…ever!

Help children understand the purpose behind the standard and live consistently by it.

Facing Leadership Challenges…

Challenges are an active part of leading. Therefore, it serves leaders well to know how to approach them.

One place to begin is communication.

Google articles on communication in leadership abound. An article from Forbes shares ten secrets about communication in leadership. Let me share two.

1) Speak not with a forked tongue: Communication and character go hand in hand. When leaders demonstrate hypocrisy, people lose trust and will not follow.

2) Speak to groups as individuals: Leaders who establish a personal atmosphere when speaking, build a rapport where a leader is heard.

Check out the Forbes article for more.

Frustrated Leadership…

What is it that frustrates us the most? While the list is endless, here are a few possibilities. 

Incompetence?
Arrogance?
Hypocrisy?
Deception?

Do we get frustrated when we see any or all of the above?

Leadership is not unique when it comes to frustration. Followers get frustrated when they see leadership involved in any of these areas also.

John Maxwell is credited with saying, “Everything rises and falls on leadership.” 

It begins with us as leaders to set the example, providing a standard to follow. We must demonstrate patience and understanding in gently leading others to this standard, not condemning or acting condescendingly concerning their actions.