Tag: Leadership

Biblical Resolution…Part 1

The Gospel of Matthew highlights Jesus instructing the disciples in what to do if a brother sins against you. He
said to “go to them in private.” Conflict could be more easily resolved if we took this approach.

Of course, Jesus continues with taking two or three witnesses, if they do not listen to you. However, the most powerful part is found at the end, “if they will not listen to the church.”

Imagine the power of an entire congregation on your doorstep to resolve the conflict.

His point is not about discipline, but about restoration. Let’s seek reconciliation.

Resolving Conflict

The challenges associated with conflict run deep and the resolutions do not come quickly. When conflict arises, what can we do?

1) Embrace the conflict. Conflict allows us the opportunity to learn from and grow through it.
2) Develop consistency. Hypocrisy is destructive, thus a consistent approach is the best start.
3) Listen to all sides. There are at least two sides to every story. Listen completely to both.
4) Respond quickly. Waiting to address conflict produces bitter and incorrect feelings.
5) Invite collective wisdom. Ask others who have faced similar conflict and learn.

This is not an exhaustive list, but with a good start we can find resolution more quickly.

An Approach to Conflict

Understanding why conflict exists is a beginning point. How should we approach conflict?

1) Anticipate conflict. With anticipation comes preparation, and when we are prepared we are better equipped to find resolution.

2) See the opportunity. Imagine the difference in facing conflict when we recognize conflict is an opportunity to improve relationships.

3) Deal with one at a time. At various times, we will face an overwhelming flood of conflict. The best approach is this step.

4) Focus on the objective. We easily lose sight of our objective, and our vision is clouded by the devastation of the conflict. Focus!

Why Does Conflict Exist?

One constant in life is “conflict.” The reality of conflict for leaders needs to be understood in order to resolve it.

At least four reasons explain why conflict exists.

1) Change always brings conflict.
2) We live in a complex and diverse world.
3) We interact with people.
4) We cannot control every situation.

Knowing these reasons is not enough. We are all aware of the fact that conflict exists and, for some, conflicts are greater now than ever before.

The question to consider is, “How do we deal with conflict when it comes?”

Over the next few days, we will explore a few suggestions.

Improving Our Leadership

Leaders must continually strive to improve. Although the author is unknown, the following thought is powerful, “The day you stop getting better is the day you better quit.”

We point to this idea frequently, but it cannot be overstated. We all need to constantly work at improvement.

Leading in the home requires more attention to provide the right foundation.

Leading at work provides direction for the success of the organization.

Leading in the church is essential to uphold truth, save souls, strengthen faith, and sustain generational leadership.

We must pursue, with fervor, the improvement of who we are and what we do as leaders.

Leading by Priority

Kingdom priority relates to the church Jesus built.

How much priority do we place upon God’s kingdom? When we look at our brothers and sisters in Christ, what priority do they see in that relationship?

When a need exists among our family, do we place an urgency upon that need?

With all the negativity surrounding the church today, where do we rank our response to kingdom priority?

As we read about unity, forgiveness, and demonstrating compassion, how are our priorities seen?

The way we treat people establishes how our priorities are seen and it demonstrates the reach of our influence as leaders.

Developing Leaders

Imagine the simplicity of following the most basic of mathematical equations, like 2 + 2. From young to old, we agree on the answer.

We need a similar formula that can be simplified for the development of leaders. What can we do to simplify the equation?

Here are a few suggestions.

1) Desire: Without this step, leaders cannot be developed.
2) Ability: A system of measurement must be in place.
3) Opportunity: Leadership development is about seeing opportunity.
4) Work-ethic: Hard work is vital to our success.
5) God: Without God, where are we leading?

These steps are foundational for a successful journey in developing strong spiritual leaders.

Sustaining Leadership

Sustainability involves maintaining a certain rate or level and includes the idea that something can be upheld or defended.

Sustainability is used in circles ranging from ecology to missiology. The application to leadership is evident.

With the figurative ebb and flow of leadership in political, educational, religious, and corporate arenas, we are challenged to understand how best to sustain leadership.

Several answers can be discovered with a little research, but the common thread to any level of sustainability in leadership involves consistency of character.

All other qualities of leadership further cement a future of leadership that is instrumental in influencing the direction of the world.

Change

Change is an idea worth our consideration in the area of biblical leadership.

Change is a biblical concept. Change is expressed in terms like return, repent, transform, restore, and other synonyms associated with it.

The kind of change worth making is intricately connected to “godly sorrow.” Change made simply because someone gets caught will not produce the right kind of change.

When change is based on an effort to live in harmony and fellowship with God, the change connects us to a life without regret and results in salvation.

Now, there is a change worth making.

The 110% Leader

In a world obsessed with “talent,” “marketing,” and “turning a buck,” we often see character and attitude overlooked in order to exploit someone’s talent for the sake of making money.

Will Smith once said, “If you’re not willing to work hard, let someone else do it. I’d rather be with someone who does a horrible job, but gives 110% than with someone who does a good job and gives 60%.”

Leadership experience has proven that a person who is willing to work hard, even though not as gifted, will outperform a person who is exceptionally gifted, but unwilling to work hard.