Tag: Master

Mastering Life

We all want control of what happens to us, but is it even possible? We have the ability to control our attitude, but do we cast blame on others in order to justify our circumstances?

Brian Tracy says, “You cannot control what happens to you, but you can control your attitude toward what happens to you, and in that, you will be mastering change rather than allowing it to master you.”

The idea challenges us to master life.

When we conduct an honest self-evaluation, what facts rise to the surface, especially when it comes to the areas that control or masters in our lives?

The Right Motive…

Paul emphasized that slaves are to render obedience to their masters with sincerity, as though they were serving Christ, not by way of eye service, simply to please an earthly master.

We live in a society that thrives on image. We have a great concern for appearance, because of how we think others see us.

Godly leaders seek to please the Lord. To the church at Corinth, Paul expressed that pleasing the Lord should be our ambition.

Our family, people at work, neighbors, and fellow Christians are all watching. When we consider our conduct, is it because we want to please those who watch or is our motive to please God?

Self-Control…

A former student, Bill West, summarized Kenneson’s approach to self-control in a powerful way.

The paradox of self-control is clearly stated, self-control is about being master over self by making self the servant (224). In both cases, the master, and subject are both self. Self-control should not be focused on self. While this at first seems to be confusing, Kenneson does a great job of explaining what he means.

Most people read the fruit of the Spirit as things to be done outward, towards other people, then come to self-control and see this as being focused inwardly. This is an incorrect assumption. Self-control, like the rest, is to be focused on others, or as Kenneson puts it ‘other-directed” (237).

I encourage you to get Kenneson’s book and read the depths of his approach to this subject.

Learn, Know, Master…

“To learn, read. To know, write. To master, teach.” Teabag

The thought is powerful and has great application for leadership. Think for a moment.

Leaders must be students, learning from every possible source. Leaders must also produce what they learn in a format that others can use for years to come. Write it down!

The last part of this thought encompasses the whole purpose of this post. Experience has demonstrated that mastery takes place when we teach. As we learn, we write down thoughts in preparation for teaching, which strengthen our knowledge of the subject. Teaching the material then leads to mastery of the subject.