Tag: Motivation

Leading Personalities…Phlegmatic

Our final personality is the Phlegmatic. They are laid back, without a care in the world.

Phlegmatics tend to get more done in a day than anyone because they do not engage in the unnecessary.

When motivated, Phlegmatics are the best workers. They are steady, loyal, hard working, quiet, and rarely get riled.

They can be lazy when unattended or unmotivated. They are not self-starters. The prefer the path of least resistance.

When motivated, however, they turn these negatives into a positive by finding better and cheaper ways to do the job. Let’s help them find the right direction by leading and serving.

Leading Personalities…Choleric

Most scholars recognize four basic personalities: Choleric, Sanguine, Melancholy and Phlegmatic. We can have all the classic traits of one or be a healthy or annoying combination. Knowing someone’s basic personality traits helps us better understand how to lead.

Someone who is Choleric is motivated to get things done even if they have to do it themselves. They struggle with delegating and can be hard to deal with, thinking they can do it better.

If mixed with another type they can warm up and be the best worker. Do we know anyone like this? Are we leading by helping someone be better at what they do?

Think leadership!

The Finish Line

The idea of focusing on the finish line at the beginning of a race does not seem realistic.

Yet, the finish line is what we must have in mind. Without knowing where the finish line is and keeping it in full view, the following occurs:

1) The motivation to start and endure is eliminated.
2) Preparation suffers because there is no purpose.
3) Without a finish line, we have no direction.

Leaders have the incredible task of helping others see the finish line. When this is accomplished, people are motivated, they prepare, and they have direction.

Don’t Stop

Ultra-distance runner, Scott Jurek, suggests we must be dedicated to our goal if we hope to stay motivated and prevent the desire to stop.

Dr. Richard Bandler said, “Failure means you’ve stopped. So don’t stop. Keep at it. The more you move in the right direction towards success, the better you’ll feel. Every day work on making new positive habits second nature — make them automatic.”

When we dedicate our life to the Lord and pursue the goal with diligence, we will remember the purpose for which we seek success.

Nothing is more worthy of our time and effort. Don’t stop!

The Power of Memory

Memory is one of the most powerful qualities of the brain as designed by God.

Memory also opens the portholes of our minds to reminisce about the events and decisions of life.

Leaders who are able to reminisce about past events that build upon achievement, victories over trials or failures, and the strength of morale will motivate others to find something deep inside that drives who they are and where they want to go.

The power of reminiscing makes the difference between being consumed with regret over past mistakes and the elation of knowing something better is ahead.

Fire-Lighting Leadership

Who are the fire-lighters in your life? We all have them and we need those who are able to say or do that one thing that excites the passion within us to act and achieve.

Leaders also need to light the fire in others. Whose fire are you lighting?

Your words and actions have the power to create motivation in the lives of others. The result changes the world.

When you extend a helping hand, speak an encouraging word, or give the most valuable gift, you make an eternal difference.

Be the leader God called you to be in this world.

Leading with Tenacity…Part 2

Tenacity is associated with grip, determination, and persistence.

The ability to grip something, or hold on firmly, is crucial for long-term success.
Determination presents an attitude of strength to endure the distractions.
Without persistence, leaders find themselves ready to give up and move on.

Tenacity, as defined in these areas, demonstrates the ability of leaders to take a group of people who might not otherwise continue and motivate them to heights unknown.

With it, leaders build confidence in their approach to the establishment of goals and the development of plans to achieve them.

Leaders must hold on with a tenacious spirit.

What’s Missing in Leadership?

Mike Maddock, a writer for Forbes online, claims, “Great leaders are open to the fact (and it is a fact) that they are missing something.”

What is missing can range from the most simple of ideas to the most complex of leadership teams.

Let’s start with humility, the kind of humility great leaders need in their leadership.

When humility is part of the equation of leadership, along with an openness to the possibilities, then people follow.

A sense of creativity, innovation, and motivation will provide a stronger morale in achieving short and long-term goals.

We cannot underestimate the power of humility in leadership.