Tag: Motives

Leadership Expectations…

Disappointment emerges when leaders expect others to live by their own personal standard of behavior.

My son says, “Live the way you would want others to live, but do not expect it of them.”

Consider these lessons.

1) We cannot know motives, so stop expecting others to live by our standard, even if it is right.

2) We limit someone’s potential when we are frustrated at their failure to measure up.

3) Everyone’s maturity level is different, because our backgrounds are not the same.

Let us measure up to the example of Christ. Then, nurture relationships with others to help them do the same. This is true leadership.

Actions and Motives…

Leaders give of their time and ability. They possess a willingness to help others reach their greatest potential for God and His church.

Leaders are also selfless. While the ideas are interrelated and it can become difficult to distinguish them, the difference is the action of one and the motivation in the other. 

Effective leadership makes the sacrifice, but the reason they make it is the selfless heart of God’s servant.

William Barclay once said, “Always give without remembering; always receive without forgetting.”

The thought speaks to actions and motives. It should motivate us to lead this way.

Ulterior Motives…

The motive behind our words and actions is always critical to the success of leadership.

The idea of an ulterior motive indicates a hidden agenda that goes beyond the obvious or stated. The difficulty that often accompanies an ulterior motive is being able to prove the motive. We tend to make accusations about the motives of others because we assume, based on words and actions, the individual has a hidden agenda.

This may or may not be true. We cannot always know the motive of others, but we do know our own. 

True spiritual leadership will demonstrate a transparency supported by the word of God. Therefore, we should lead others openly, promoting a pure and sincere motive.