Tag: Motives

Hold the Helm

Consider a statement made by Publilius Syrus, “Anyone can hold the helm when the sea is calm.” Perhaps we could say, “It is not difficult to have faith when life is going well.”

The challenge to faith (holding the helm) involves trusting that God is in control and engaged in life, that He looks out for your best interest even when life is not going well.

Spiritual leaders will face numerous storms, disbelief in the vision and goals often exists, jealousy that creates doubt in your motives, and gossip, slander, and malice spread discrediting you.

Hold the helm! Remain strong in the faith! Keep your eyes focused on Jesus! Continue to lead!

Passionate Leaders

According to Dr. Tim Elmore, what you want (desires), why you have want it (motives), and how badly you want it (passion) all speak to fundamentals of leadership.

Little is accomplished without passion. Our challenge involves how to determine that passion.

President of Growing Leaders, Steve Moore, emphasizes the necessity of recognizing the difference between “interest-based passions and issue-based passions.”

Interest-based passions are areas we have an interest in combined with a natural ability, often times sports or recreational activities.

Issue-based passions are connected to causes which provide fulfillment, and “give us a sense of purpose,” such as rectifying social injustices.

What are you passionate about?

Actions and Motives

Leaders give of their time and ability to help others. It demands their attention and willingness to see others reach their greatest potential. Whatever it takes becomes the mindset of spiritual leaders who sacrifice their own will for the will of God.

The idea of selflessness is so interrelated it becomes difficult to distinguish. However, the difference is seen in the action of one and the motivation in the other. Effective leadership will make sacrifices, but the reason they make them is the selfless heart of God’s servant.

These two concepts speak for themselves, but the related ideas help all of us lead with the right actions and motives.

Identifying the Unlikely

Identifying the unlikely can be subjective to each individual. However we identify the unlikely, the need is evident when it comes to our leadership. Where should we start?

They live everywhere, but often have nowhere to live.
They have nothing to give, yet often give all they have to help someone else.
They scrape by with little hope, yet hope is often all they have to scrape by.

We must look for ways to give hope of a life that is better now and in the future.

We must provide genuine friendship without ulterior motives, where we develop an intimacy that goes beyond the surface.

Leadership Expectations…

Disappointment emerges when leaders expect others to live by their own personal standard of behavior.

My son says, “Live the way you would want others to live, but do not expect it of them.”

Consider these lessons.

1) We cannot know motives, so stop expecting others to live by our standard, even if it is right.

2) We limit someone’s potential when we are frustrated at their failure to measure up.

3) Everyone’s maturity level is different, because our backgrounds are not the same.

Let us measure up to the example of Christ. Then, nurture relationships with others to help them do the same. This is true leadership.

Actions and Motives…

Leaders give of their time and ability. They possess a willingness to help others reach their greatest potential for God and His church.

Leaders are also selfless. While the ideas are interrelated and it can become difficult to distinguish them, the difference is the action of one and the motivation in the other. 

Effective leadership makes the sacrifice, but the reason they make it is the selfless heart of God’s servant.

William Barclay once said, “Always give without remembering; always receive without forgetting.”

The thought speaks to actions and motives. It should motivate us to lead this way.

Ulterior Motives…

The motive behind our words and actions is always critical to the success of leadership.

The idea of an ulterior motive indicates a hidden agenda that goes beyond the obvious or stated. The difficulty that often accompanies an ulterior motive is being able to prove the motive. We tend to make accusations about the motives of others because we assume, based on words and actions, the individual has a hidden agenda.

This may or may not be true. We cannot always know the motive of others, but we do know our own. 

True spiritual leadership will demonstrate a transparency supported by the word of God. Therefore, we should lead others openly, promoting a pure and sincere motive.