Tag: Relationships

Successful Leadership

As leaders within the spiritual setting, the ultimate determination of success is realized at the throne of God. But, how can we prepare for such success?

1) Having SMART goals and plans to reach those goals.
2) Continuing to grow and develop our relationship with God.
3) Using the truth of God’s word for every decision.
4) Developing and strengthening relationships with others.
5) Assisting others in reaching their potential.
6) Equipping them with the right tools.
7) Knowing God…

If we can implement these few ideas from the beginning, success will follow.

Head and Heart Leadership

Using our head in leading means we:
…think before we speak or act.
…consider the short- and long-term consequences of our words and actions.
…weigh the evidence and ask evaluating questions before making decisions.

Using our heart in leading means we:
…devote ourselves to learning and serving the needs of others.
…prioritize our time toward relationship development.
…risk temporary satisfaction for eternal gain.

If we work to develop and practice a more “others-focused” approach, the future will take on a whole new perspective.

Transitional Bridges

When writing a speech, book, article, or other medium, one of the critical pieces is transitions. Transitions are bridges.

These bridges make it easier for people to follow what we express.

Our role as leaders is about transitions. We build bridges in three areas.

One, we build a bridge in relationships. We must establish and maintain quality relationships.

Two, we build a bridge for future leaders. As long as the world exist, the need for leadership exists.

Three, we build a bridge to eternity. Our task is to transition from the physical realm to the spiritual.

Are we building bridges with the right purpose and in the right direction?

Who, How, and Why

Three significant questions surface in your leadership.

First, “Who are you trying to reach?” Churches often talk about trying to reach their communities, but rarely are they willing to take the necessary steps to do so. The answer here makes a difference in the direction and steps taken in the next question.

Second, “How will you reach them?” It may take specific marketing technique, extra time in the community, developing stronger relationships, financial means, or additional people. You must be willing to do whatever it takes.

Third, and perhaps most importantly, “Why are you doing this?” If you can’t answer this question with certainty and clarity, people will not follow long.

Being the Right Leader

How many times has it been said in relationships, “If only I could find the right person?”

Gloria Steinem once said, “Far too many people are looking for the right person, instead of trying to be the right person.”

If not careful, we can spend all our time searching for the right person, when all we can do is focus on being the right person.

We should focus our life on being the right person and allow that pursuit to direct every attitude, decision, action, and word.

When it does, we will discover the right people will find us.

Investing in Relationships

Life can be discouraging when others take us for granted. Perhaps we can relate to how others feel when we take them for granted.

This happens in families, at school, on the job, around our neighborhoods, and hundreds of other places each day.

Whether we are taken for granted, or we take others for granted, as leaders we have a responsibility.

Without investing in these relationships, we lose the opportunity to influence others in ways that lead to lasting friendships and eternal rewards.

We cannot change others, but we can look at ourselves and address the changes needed to eliminate taking others for granted.

Relational Leaders

Think about your personal influence as it relates to the development of others to lead.

Our paths cross with a variety of people from all walks of life. Throughout life, we may experience relationships with hundreds, if not, thousands of people.

During these encounters we make decisions about the individuals we want to spend more time with in order to develop a deeper relationship. These relationships make us vulnerable as we begin sharing our personal lives: failures, weaknesses, and even inadequacies.

Remember, the effort we put forth to develop these relationships extends beyond this physical life into eternal realms.

Rating Our Leadership

We enjoy the idea of rating performance, looks, ability, etc. and, generally, we use a scale from 1 to 10. How would we rate our leadership?

While consistent standards are helpful, we need to realize a couple of factors.

1) People will rate our leadership (whether we like it or not).
2) Our rating is based on ability, decisions, relationships, and previous success.
3) We will give an account to God for our leadership.
4) The final measuring device will be God’s word.

Changing our rating is up to us. When we use God’s word, on a scale of 1 to 10, how will our leadership measure up?

Defining Moments

Occasionally, there are those events that becoming defining moments in our life. The birth of a child, getting married, graduation, critical decisions on the job, or tragedies are those moments in life that define who we are and influence who we become.

These defining moments vary from one individual to the next and the degree to which they define us is based on what we do in those moments.

The most defining moment in our lives as leaders must be built on the foundation of God. When our relationship with God is the defining moment, the decisions and activities that form the rest of our lives find their proper place.

Interdependency

Rarely do leaders consider the interdependency of relationships. These are relationships where people are dependent on each other.

Our culture focuses on independence, a make it on your own mentality. Pride often hinders us from ever seeking or asking for help from anyone else.

The other side of the coin is one where we become dependent on someone else without contributing to the relationship ourselves.

When we take a learning posture and realize others can teach, guide, and offer something to help us in our role as leaders, we begin to fulfill an interdependency that will strengthen our ability to lead.