Tag: Relationships

One Shot

At times, we only have one shot at an opportunity God provides in leading others to Christ.

If we only had one shot, would we understand the necessity of making it count? What factors need to be considered to make it count?

The priority must be Christ. Focus everything on Him.

Develop relationships. People need to know Jesus and when we develop those relationships, we can change their lives eternally.

In reality, we do not know how many opportunities will be provided. One shot may be all we have and need, so be ready for it and make it count!

Familiarity…

Developing familiarity between leaders and followers takes time and a process that involves several key factors.

A mutual respect for life experiences builds a stronger relationship of trust in the common goals and expectations of the group.

When we share life experiences with each other, familiarity grows stronger. It is the biblical teaching of “weep with those who weep and rejoice with those who rejoice.”

An open door policy contributes to the approach-ability of everyone involved. Achieving this task is not easy, but the results bring lasting leadership.

The stronger our familiarity, the stronger our leadership.

Multicultural Leaders…

Denying that we live in a multicultural society does a great disservice to our leadership. It is not about when it happens, it already has.

If we are not knowledgeable about and preparing more fervently to address it, we are way behind.

How should we lead in a multicultural context?

1) Stop procrastinating and gain a better understanding of multiculturalism.
2) Get immersed in developing relationships across those cultural boundaries.
3) Remember, we get to participate in what God continues to do in our world.

The future of our leadership depends on what we do now.

Mentoring Leaders…

The purpose and design of mentoring is to create a relationship that nurtures learning. One of the key components required is responsibility.

A learner takes responsibility for the priorities, learning, and resources for achieving self-direction. The idea expresses moving “from dependence to independence to interdependence” (3).

Several elements are also essential to a learning-centered mentoring program: reciprocity, relationship, partnership, collaboration, mutually defined goals, and development.

These elements are designed to promote relationships that motivate, inspire, and contribute to development and growth.

For more information, read Lois Zachary’s book, The Mentor’s Guide, Facilitating Effective Learning Relationships.

Kindness…

Kindness applies to every area of the Christian life.

Kenneson’s application of kindness begins by asking how important others are to our life’s story? Reflecting on the most cherished and admired relationships, in what ways are they characterized by interdependence?

A Christian’s life is intricately woven into the lives of other people. How different would our approach to kindness be if our livelihood was dependent on others and their livelihood dependent on us?

Listening and interacting with others is crucial to demonstrating kindness. If Christians demonstrate more kindness in a culture that is characterized by self-sufficiency, imagine how different the world might look.

The Power of Listening…

In leadership, communication becomes critical to the success of building relationships and reaching goals.

Leaders who communicate well are able to articulate the vision, inspire the actions of others, and strengthen the character of an organization to achieve long-lasting rewards.

However, the foundation for these three areas requires the ability to actively listen.

When leaders do not listen, they communicate a lack of concern or care about the other person.

If leaders take time to be silent, remove distractions, focus on the person speaking, and truly listen, amazing results occur.

Leaders build stronger relationships, encourage followers, and take steps to achieve their goals.

Fearless Trust…

Throughout many of the Psalms, David writes about his fearless trust in God.

Leaders need a relationship with God that exudes trust in Him to provide everything needed to fulfill His will. How does this develop?

In a word “seeking” Him.

Seek a dwelling in the house of the Lord every day.
Seek to behold the beauty of the Lord.
Seek to meditate in His temple.

If leaders seek these three areas, they develop a greater relationship with God and others.

A Considerate Leader…

A considerate leader stands out.

They have a heart for others. Leaders are challenged to consider the good intention of others first. We live in a skeptical world. We tend to question the motive or intention of everyone, including those who deserve our greatest trust.

A considerate leader thinks about the needs of others. The needs are hard to recognize when we only experience superficial relationships. Leaders must get below the surface and learn the real need and consider how to provide it.

Consideration should be a part of a leader’s daily walk in relationships. Doing so exemplifies the compassion of great leadership.

Listen, Think, Speak…

Solomon wrote that a word spoken in the right circumstances was “like apples of gold in settings of silver.”

Few principles carry more weight in leadership than this one.

The challenge is how to develop this ability. 

1) Actively listen. A key attribute for learning what to say at the right time is to listen. There are times silence speaks more to the need than words.

2) Think before speaking. The tendency is to speak as soon as the thought crosses our mind. Relationships are often destroyed when we speak too quickly.

These two suggestions provide a foundation to speak the right words in the right circumstance.

Leadership Expectations…

Disappointment emerges when leaders expect others to live by their own personal standard of behavior.

My son says, “Live the way you would want others to live, but do not expect it of them.”

Consider these lessons.

1) We cannot know motives, so stop expecting others to live by our standard, even if it is right.

2) We limit someone’s potential when we are frustrated at their failure to measure up.

3) Everyone’s maturity level is different, because our backgrounds are not the same.

Let us measure up to the example of Christ. Then, nurture relationships with others to help them do the same. This is true leadership.