Tag: Respect

Leading with Respect

Regardless of the environment or situation, people want leaders who respect and value how they contribute to the achievement of organizational goals.

Few areas, however, gain respect more quickly than by showing respect to and for others. A couple of suggestions include: 1) attention given to work accomplished, 2) time to build relationships, 3) accepting responsibility and giving accountability, 4) transparency, and 5) trust.

Leaders who strive to gain, earn, and achieve respect lead with heart. They touch the lives of those who follow and change the power of teamwork in the growth of any organization.

Adding Value

What kind of value is needed to enhance our ability to lead?
How can we add the greatest value to our leadership?
Why does adding value mark the difference in long-term development?

The value needed to enhance our ability to lead involves respect. Value is added to our leadership over time and by demonstrating integrity during critical decisions.

The reason this value marks the difference in long-term development is because respect is elicited as a result of a leader’s abilities and achievements.

Respect is one value that when added to leadership changes the power of our leadership.

Familiarity…

Developing familiarity between leaders and followers takes time and a process that involves several key factors.

A mutual respect for life experiences builds a stronger relationship of trust in the common goals and expectations of the group.

When we share life experiences with each other, familiarity grows stronger. It is the biblical teaching of “weep with those who weep and rejoice with those who rejoice.”

An open door policy contributes to the approach-ability of everyone involved. Achieving this task is not easy, but the results bring lasting leadership.

The stronger our familiarity, the stronger our leadership.

Dealing with Failure…

When leaders fail, trust and respect are lost. The task before leaders is learning how to regain what they lose.

Consider three negatives: 

  1. Do not try to ignore or deny failure. 
  2. Do not attempt to cover up the failure.
  3. Never blame someone else for it.

Instead, four positives are needed: 

  1. Admit the failure. 
  2. Specify the failure. 
  3. Ask for forgiveness.
  4. Give a step by step plan for overcoming the failure.

More could be considered, but a simple upfront approach is where healing begins.

Leading as a Friend…

Friendship is a relationship of mutual trust and support. We have all witnessed the powerful effects of true friendship. 

Leadership is not always seen this way. Leadership is often seen as a lonely position. We hear the idea expressed, “It’s lonely at the top.”

However, if we are going to fulfill the responsibility of spiritual leadership we must be involved in the lives of others, developing friendships.

Jesus was called “a friend of tax collectors and sinners” (Mt. 11:19). When leaders develop relationships of mutual trust and support, friendships blossom that provide a source of strength and encouragement for life’s challenges.

Most importantly, we help others get to heaven.