Tag: Suffering

Lead Like Jesus

Peter clearly points out that Jesus suffered, leaving an example to follow in His steps.

Peter’s first letter is one that acknowledges the need for Christians to prepare for suffering, not to be surprised when suffering occurs, and to know that when they suffer as Christians they are blessed.

Would we think differently about the words of the song, “Oh To Be Like Thee,” if we knew that we were asking to suffer as Jesus suffered?

We often hear, “Lead like Jesus.” Will our leadership involve suffering for the cause of the Lord? Are we willing to lead like Him?

Imitating Christ

Scripture instructs us to be an imitator of Christ. Peter identifies that Jesus left an example that we should walk in His steps.

What exactly does that mean? In context, Peter’s statement to Christians related to suffering.

Hopefully, we possess a conviction to walk in His steps, even when suffering.

Our prayer is that we draw closer to our God, understand more fully the example left for us to follow, and then live our life as a reflection of His example.

Where will it take us? If we follow it through, we might just find an amazing path before us.

Suffering Leaders…

Jesus suffered on numerous occasions. He suffered verbally and physically.

The religious leaders were intent on eliminating this threat to their position and power.

At the hands of Rome, Jesus encountered suffering beyond imagination. He was beaten, ridiculed, mocked, crowned with thorns, spit upon, scourged, and nailed to a cross.

His suffering demonstrated the greatness of His leadership.

John Maxwell said, “The higher one goes in leadership, the greater the sacrifice.” Will suffering demonstrate the greatness of our leadership today?

Glory Through Suffering…

An interesting connection exists between suffering and glory. Look through God’s word and see how they relate and their connection to the life of Jesus.

Certainly, we are all aware of how Jesus suffered while here on earth: His persecution, shame, and sacrifice at the cross.

No one longs for or anticipates suffering. We desire the glory to come, but we must realize the suffering related to that glory and lead with an understanding of such.

Paul identifies that the sufferings of this present life are not worthy to be compared to the glory to be revealed to us, but suffering does come first.

Joy…

Joy exceeds simple pleasure. Kenneson claims joy is the byproduct of our desire for something more outward.

The other-directedness nature of joy shows why it is so closely connected to love. If love be related to God’s grace, the gift exemplifies a significance between these two Greek words: charis (grace) and chara (joy).

Scripture connects suffering with joy, and “living joyfully despite persecution and affliction does not require one to deny the reality of suffering or pain” (63).

We cultivate joy when we rejoice in the opportunity to worship God, nurture contentment, and learn to enjoy children.

This is only the beginning.

The Power of Passion…

What is it that drives our lives, especially as leaders?

Steve Jobs once said, “It [what you choose to do] has got to be something that you’re passionate about because otherwise you won’t have the perseverance to see it through.”

While we associate passion with excitement or enthusiasm, there is much more involved.

Passion is from a Latin word associated with suffering or sacrifice.

When leaders are passionate, it is seen by what they are willing to suffer, sacrifice, or give up in order to achieve the goal. 

When passion is present, leaders persevere to see it through.

Lifelong Leadership…

Leadership is a lifelong process. Here are a few lessons to consider. 

Leadership is developed over time. God works to develop our leadership over a lifetime. He trains by giving us the experience we need. 

Developing a leader involves periods of suffering. These times may result in isolation, which helps us reflect and prepare for greater leadership.

Proper perspective is the goal of leadership development. When we recognize God’s hand in our life, our perspective changes, even when we suffer. 

If we trust in God’s working, we become the masterpiece He desires of us.

Suffering Leadership…

A leader with passion and little talent will always out perform a leader with talent and little passion. E.M. Forster said, “One person with passion is better than forty people merely interested.

However, our modern definition of passion leaves much to be desired, because we often limit our thinking to enthusiasm or excitement.

The word is originally derived from a Latin word that means “to suffer.”

Leaders need enthusiasm. They need to be driven to achieve their goals, but when leaders are passionate they willingly make sacrifices.

Leadership is never easy, but the results of passionate leadership are always life-changing.