Tag: Vision

Light…

Light represents far more than “a source of illumination,” especially for spiritual leaders.

We could say that light is simply the absence of darkness: “God is light and in Him there is no darkness at all.”

Our light needs to shine forth the example of Jesus as it revealed throughout the Gospels.

A good study of light can be found in the Gospel of John. The next time you read through it, highlight the word “light.” Consider how the word is used in context and how it applies to casting a vision built on faith for leaders.

Vision of the Sequel…

A prequel refers to the stories or events preceding an existing work. A sequel involves part two of an earlier “box office sensation.” It’s about what happens next.

The variety of events experienced in life become instrumental in forming who we are today. They are connected as part of our bigger story.

However, we have to wonder, what happens next?

Wisdom is built upon remembering the past in order to understand the present, but vision is cast to prepare for the sequel in our leadership. What do you see?

Leadership Development…

One of the great struggles facing the church today involves leadership development.

Congregations struggle with poorly equipped––if not unqualified––leaders, or no leadership at all. Sadly, far too many congregations have no idea who will fill the needed leadership positions of tomorrow.

It raises the question, “Are we suffering the consequences of past failures to plan for leadership?”

As we gaze into 2021, God’s people should recognize the challenge, and current leaders must rise up to prepare leaders for the future.

What we need is a vision that benefits the Lord’s kingdom with experienced leaders in the next generation, because it impacts our children and grandchildren!

Five Leadership Components…

Organization, arrangement, design, forethought, and groundwork are key components in our leadership.

Organization: Organizational success is determined by the strength of its leadership.

Arrangement: The arrangement of each component is critical for development.

Design: The design stage in planning is where dreams unfold into direction.

Forethought: When planning, forethought includes vision, goals, mission, core values, people, and obstacles.

Groundwork: The groundwork is based on the forethought given to the specific nature of planning.

When leaders in the Lord’s kingdom give thought to planning based on these five components, the reality of success occurs at the right time and the right place.

Leading with Optimism…

Pessimism or optimism? The choice is ours.

Although the author is unknown, the thought is powerful, “Stop being afraid of what could go wrong and focus on what could go right.”

Fear is real. No matter how we might deny or ignore its existence, if left unchecked, fear can stop us in our tracks.

Fear of what could go wrong also causes us to worry and dwell on negativity, both of which bring a great level of unpleasantness.

When we focus on what can go right, we lead with a vision of tomorrow that promotes hope and gives people something to believe in for the future.

Creative Leadership…

Think about the creative nature of God as He designed the universe. Consider the incredible creative design of the human body.

Creativity surrounds us everywhere we go. The ability of the human mind to use imagination to draw, paint, build, sculpt and do a million other things demonstrates the creative nature of people made in the image of God.

When it comes down to leadership, a little creativity goes a long way in helping others reach their potential.

The same is true when sharing vision for the future. Leaders need the ability to go there in their mind first before helping others see it.

What are the Possibilities?

Opportunity has been defined as circumstances presenting possibility. For someone to take advantage of the opportunity, one must see the possibilities. Nicholas Sparks said, “It’s the possibility that keeps me going, not the guarantee.”

When we look at our neighborhood, city, state, nation, or the global community, what possibilities keep us going? Can we see how God is working?

Leadership will not succeed if we only look for guarantees. The possibilities of what God can and will do through us must keep us going.

When leadership is fueled by possibilities, our vision expands toward greater achievement.

The Power of Listening…

In leadership, communication becomes critical to the success of building relationships and reaching goals.

Leaders who communicate well are able to articulate the vision, inspire the actions of others, and strengthen the character of an organization to achieve long-lasting rewards.

However, the foundation for these three areas requires the ability to actively listen.

When leaders do not listen, they communicate a lack of concern or care about the other person.

If leaders take time to be silent, remove distractions, focus on the person speaking, and truly listen, amazing results occur.

Leaders build stronger relationships, encourage followers, and take steps to achieve their goals.

Leading with Vision and Goals…

Goals should be framed with specifics that can be measured. They should be achievable and relevant. We also need to set a time for achieving them.

For example: “Over the next 6 months I will read the Old Testament,” or “In the next 12 months I want to share the gospel with 24 new people.” These goals meet all the requirements.

Short and long-term goals are key components to developing plans for moving forward.

Leaders need long-term vision, but remember that short-term goals keep people motivated. Celebrating these short-term achievements helps keep everyone focused on the long-term vision.

Contingent Leadership…

The one consistency facing leadership today is change. Apart from technology, science, medicine, etc., people change!

When leaders cast the vision, point others to the goal, and establish plans, change occurs. Several questions should be considered.

What contingency is in place when changes occur?
Are the consequences of a contingency minimal?
Will the contingency create a loss of morale?
Who will implement the contingency during the transition?
How will the contingency affect the overall vision and goals?
When is the appropriate time to initiate the contingency?

Answering a few questions can help negotiate challenges that occur when change is inevitable.