Tag: Vision

An Approach to Conflict

Understanding why conflict exists is a beginning point. How should we approach conflict?

1) Anticipate conflict. With anticipation comes preparation, and when we are prepared we are better equipped to find resolution.

2) See the opportunity. Imagine the difference in facing conflict when we recognize conflict is an opportunity to improve relationships.

3) Deal with one at a time. At various times, we will face an overwhelming flood of conflict. The best approach is this step.

4) Focus on the objective. We easily lose sight of our objective, and our vision is clouded by the devastation of the conflict. Focus!

Turning Failure Into Success

When failure happens, it is often debilitating. We struggle to move forward and benefit from the experience.

Failure, however, can lead to success when we realize that it reveals ways not to do something, allowing us to channel our focus, investing our efforts into areas that lead to success.

Approaching failure with this mindset changes how we establish a vision for the future and how we respond to the challenges we face in life.

Spiritual leaders help others through times of failure with a vision of real success. Here we find motivation to conquer the greatest of failures.

Complexity of Leadership

Life is complicated. Just when we feel like we have a good handle on it, something changes. Even when we have a vision, spend hours setting goals and establishing plans, there seems to always be that one item that throws us a “curve ball.”

Leadership can be tricky. As complicated as life can be, when leading others, the complexities increase.

Providing structure is essential to understanding the nature in which all the components required to achieve our vision are implemented.

This structure keeps everyone focused and active.

The work can be difficult, but when it is accomplished, everyone grows.

Catching Fire

Leaders need to stop looking at the negative, discouraging, and depressing nature of situations, and step up with some enthusiasm that will take action.

Steve Harvey says, “Catch fire today! Make today the day you stop complaining and do something!”

Nothing is more significant to the development of solid leadership than “catching fire.”

Somehow, leaders must present an example of moving away from the individualistic / humanistic philosophy that characterizes so much of our world.

Imagine a world where leaders spent their time focused on developing others to reach their greatest potential.

Now there is a vision worth catching fire to achieve.

May it be so!

A Vision of Jesus

Jesus reshaped the way the Samaritan woman at the well saw Him. She began thinking Jesus was an ordinary Jew, but before the conversation was over, she recognized Him as the Messiah.

Jesus then helped the apostles look at the multitude of Samaritans from a different perspective, a harvest needing to be harvested.

There is an interesting lesson here – How we see Jesus changes the way we see others. As leaders we desperately need to see Jesus from a biblical perspective and recognize that all people deserve to be seen in need of His grace.

This is the vision godly leaders need.

Constructive Leadership

To be constructive involves something that is useful with a tendency to build up.

Constructive leaders are characterized by several key qualities.

They have a vision for what is right.
They possess an understanding of what is beneficial.
They provide tools to assist followers in reaching their potential.
They are driven by the desire to achieve the good of others.

These ideas provide a beginning point related to the nature of constructive leadership.

When the church is led by constructive leaders, spiritual and numerical growth will naturally go hand in hand.

A Conveying Leader

Conveyance involves the action of making an idea, feeling, or impression known or understandable to someone.

The bottom line is communication. Leaders must be good communicators. They know the vision, mission, and values that drive the organization.

When the story of God’s mission unfolds in the life of Jesus, the heart of His vision, mission, and values conveys hope with eternal ramifications.

It changed the lives of 3,000 people on the day of Pentecost.
Numerous disciples / apostles suffered and died to see others obey it.
The message has the same power to save two thousand years later.

Let us lead with conveyance.

What Do We See?

Vision is not just about sight, but insight to see beyond what is right in front of us.

When we look at the world around us, what do we see?
When we look at our neighbors and friends, what do we see?
When we look at our families, what do we see?
When we look at the church, what do we see?
When we look at ourselves, what do we see?

Our vision strongly affects the way we see others and ourselves. Our vision is foundational to our understanding of and approach to the urgency before us.

Sticky Leadership…

Authors, Chip and Dan Heath, wrote Made To Stick.

It raises two questions. Why are some books, articles, people or situations remembered vividly, while others are forgotten? Why do we remember one situation so easily and readily forget others?

Leaders need to learn how to communicate the message, vision, and goals in ways that are sticky, helping others easily remember them along the journey.

The six ideas shared by the Heath’s indicate that when the communication is simple, unexpected, concrete, credible, emotional, and built in story format, people tend to remember. Give it a try.

Light…

Light represents far more than “a source of illumination,” especially for spiritual leaders.

We could say that light is simply the absence of darkness: “God is light and in Him there is no darkness at all.”

Our light needs to shine forth the example of Jesus as it revealed throughout the Gospels.

A good study of light can be found in the Gospel of John. The next time you read through it, highlight the word “light.” Consider how the word is used in context and how it applies to casting a vision built on faith for leaders.