Tag: Biblical

Unsuspecting Leadership

When leadership exists without the suspicion of motives and actions on the part of followers, a environment exists described as unsuspecting leadership.

When a leader’s character exemplifies the kind of integrity that is built on values of godliness, then the motives and actions of the leader are not questioned by followers.

The beauty of biblical leadership is found when both ideas are present in the relationship. The result displays trust, not a trust that is superficial, but one that provides transparency and strengthens the core of the church.

Developing this relationship takes time. Quality and durability are rarely the reward of implementing something quickly.

Circle of Safety

Mark Twain expressed the following idea, “Great things can happen if we don’t care who gets the credit.”

John Maxwell took this idea to another level saying, “Great things can and actually do happen when we give others the credit.”

We know from a biblical perspective that spiritual leadership will not allow a self-centered attitude to exist. Instead, scripture indicates over and over the need to seek after the well-being of others.

Jesus provided this example for us and He desires we pursue the same direction. The result might just develop what Simon Sinek refers to as a “Circle of Safety.”

The Urgency of Leadership

A description of the need to study leadership covers a wide spectrum. God’s design is the overarching premise by which we understand the necessity of leadership.

The lack of leadership, or the representation of poor leadership, is plaguing the church.

Decisions are left to the majority vote in a men’s business or congregational meeting. Sadly, the minority generally rules when this occurs.

According to God’s design, elders (leaders) were appointed to shepherd and provide biblical direction for God’s people. When this does not occur, the church suffers.

Therefore, the urgency for biblical leadership must be a priority for His church today.

Change

A few key facts about change.

First, we generally fear change. The older we get the more we dislike change.

Second, not all change is bad. Sometimes change is good.

Third, change is biblical. Repentance means change.

Fourth, change is part of growth.

Where we need to focus is on changing ourselves. Jesus addressed this in Matthew 7:1-5. Most of the world knows verse one, but the idea is we need to look at ourselves and make the needed changes before attempting to help others change.

Path of Leadership

The path of leadership development will not be an easy task for anyone, anywhere. The benefits, however, are far more valuable than the consequences of denying or ignoring the present circumstances.

Consider the benefits of the path before us:

Stronger leadership: The unified strength of numerous leaders multiplies the results of what can be accomplished.

Spiritual guidance: The potential of developing leaders provides a spiritual foundation that increases biblical guidance.  

Succession plan: Developing stronger, spiritual leaders only for the present potentially leaves a generation not knowing God.

The path of leadership development must go beyond this generation. When this happens, we walk the right path.

Transitions

Our family has experienced transitions on several fronts. Multiple moves from one city and state to another is challenging. Add to that a change in culture and climate, the challenges increase. Transitions may or may not be as difficult as a major move, but they introduce challenges nonetheless.

The church continues to face transitions.

Regardless of where we stand on the challenges introduced during a time of transition, the bottom line is the same. Without solid, biblically guided leadership the time of transition will make or break the direction of growth.

The church cannot grow beyond the strength of its leadership.

How Will We Lead?

How will we lead…

Our children? The choices they make, places they frequent, friends they associate with, and work ethic they possess.

Our church? The confidence of the church, their hope for a better tomorrow, and their assurance of an eternal destiny.

Our neighbors? Who they seek during trials, where they turn with spiritual questions, and how they see Jesus.

Our friends? The development of a spiritual focus, thoughts of relationships, and how to deal with giving into temptation.

Our co-workers? Their knowledge of biblical principles, their understanding of character, and approach to life.

Considering their future is worth giving thought to how we will lead.

Positive Leadership

When we consider how God has empowered us with the ability to choose, and that he has provided redemption and freedom from the consequences of sin, how can we not live in Biblical joy.

We not only have a reason to live, but a reason to have joy in this life as we anticipate the coming of an eternal one.

Considering the information given to us, our efforts as leaders must be to make a positive change.

The external circumstances will always exist and challenge the core of leadership. However, we must arise above it and lead to make a positive change, and it all begins with us!

Control

We often claim that someone needs to take control. We talk about people being controlling. We preach about self-control. We even discuss the need to be in control.

Why is it important for spiritual leadership?

When situations get out of hand, leaders must take control.
Spiritual leadership must not be controlling.
Leaders should be the epitome of self-control.
We look to these leaders when someone needs to be in control.

When leaders know how to use their power of influence in a Biblical and godly way, people’s behavior and the course of events can be shaped in ways to change eternity.

Noah

Noah never led a large group of people: just his wife, three sons, and their spouses. Take a closer look at his leadership.

Character: “Noah was a righteous man, blameless in his time; Noah walked with God.” Very few in scripture matched his character.

Ability to follow:
Noah did all the Lord commanded. Noah followed God. Before anyone can lead they must learn to follow.

Fortitude: He was a preacher of righteousness. His tenure was approximately 120 years. No one was converted, but he never swayed from the course.

These three qualities identify a great biblical leader. The same is true today.