Tag: Biblical

A Good Thing

Is it possible there can be too much of a good thing?

A good thing is generally subjective to each individual based on their worldview. Obviously, this introduces a number of challenges.

When we consider the range of mindsets from self-serving to self-denying, we realize quickly that a good thing can either be about what benefits “me” or “others.”

From a biblical perspective, leadership focuses on the benefits of others, placing their needs above our own.

If everyone understood and practiced this form of leadership, I am pretty certain we could not have too much of a good thing?

Future of Leadership

What does leadership look like for the church’s future?

We see what waiting for people to develop on their own accomplishes, and the outcome is not favorable.

We must be proactive in developing future leaders through training. The Lord’s church needs solid leaders. We are not only responsible, but also accountable for our approach in developing leaders.

Nothing happens by accident. Leaders do not just wake up one day and say, “I’ll lead.” They must be groomed carefully, strategically, and biblically in order to direct the future of the church.

The time is now. Let us pursue the task with diligence.

The Precedent…

A precedent occurs when a previous event or action becomes an example or guide that is considered for similar circumstances in the future.

Throughout scripture we learn both what should be done and what should not be done based on a precedent established.

By definition, application of biblical events and actions are powerful examples that must be considered for similar circumstances in the future.

The terminology we use states, “If we do not learn from history, we are doomed to repeat it.” Some of the greatest lessons on leadership are based on these biblical precedents.

Developing Tomorrow’s Leaders…

What are we doing about the present condition of leadership? What are we doing about the future of leadership? What are we doing to develop biblical leaders?

Challenges exist in every effort to improve the situation. These attempts are often viewed with skepticism.

Enthusiasm to learn and implement something new or different is dismissed as youthful, but lacking long-term substance.

What are we doing to change eternity if the only thing we are doing is exactly what we have done for the past 50 years? The results speak for themselves.

We need to recognize where we are, where we are going, and what we must do to get there.

Leadership Begins In The Home…

Perhaps you’ve heard it said, “What parents excuse in moderation, children will abuse in excess.”

The hearts and minds of children are sculpted from a young age. Our influence is greater than we can imagine.

Parents need to give serious consideration to the words and activities expressed in their lives.

They must live a standard in the home they are comfortable with seeing their children live out in excess. Parents face enough challenges battling worldly influences. Why take chances on living an example that questions the biblical precedence of godliness?

Use the home as a refuge sanctified by the teachings of God’s word.

Optimistic Leadership…

Nelson Mandela said, “I am fundamentally an optimist. Whether that comes from nature or nurture, I cannot say. Part of being optimistic is keeping one’s head pointed toward the sun, one’s feet moving forward. There were many dark moments when my faith in humanity was sorely tested, but I would not and could not give myself up to despair. That way lays defeat and death.”

We are challenged to remain positive and optimistic in a world filled with the kind of hatred that fosters negativity and pessimism.

Dark moments will come, but biblical leaders understand the hope in Christ that endures despair.

The victory Jesus achieved must keep us focused and moving forward.

Producing Leaders…

A producer is a person that makes, grows, or supplies goods or commodities for sale. They are builders, constructors, farmers, managers, administrators, promoters, etc. To sum it up in one thought, they “gets things done.”

When considering the nature of leadership, are we producing?

If we are not involved in getting things done, then how can we become the leader God wants?

Biblical leadership is about cultivating the soil, planting, and watering the seed that allows God to give the increase, thus bearing fruit.

We must focus on our God given task. Then, step back and watch the power of God!

Knowing God…

Biblical leadership involves qualities, traits, virtues, and principles that guide character formation. As such, a biblical leader is one who desires to know God.

Scripture is filled with passages that emphasize the need to know God. Jesus said eternal life is aligned with knowing God and the One who was sent by Him.

Paul counted everything as loss for the “surpassing value of knowing Christ Jesus” (Phil. 3:8). His heritage, material possessions, academic achievement, and religious position were worthless when laid alongside this knowledge.

Biblical leaders are driven by a passion to grow in the grace and knowledge of the Lord.

Patience…

Patience is often said to be a desired virtue, but one we fail to demonstrate.

In a society geared toward productivity, the clock becomes a slave driver and the loss of control challenges every level of patience.

Kenneson identifies patience as yielding control to another (109). Biblical patience is others-directed.

Obstacles include segmenting, regulating, and hoarding time, as well as, exalting productivity, and the desire for speed.

Patience is cultivated by remembering God’s patience with us in times we stumble through life determining our place in His redemptive story. We also cultivate patience by thinking of time differently, as a gift instead of commodity.

Peace…

Peace is often associated with the absence of conflict, but the Hebrew word shalom and the Greek word eirênê both carry the idea of wholeness and harmony.

Kenneson points out that promotion of individualism strikes at the heart of achieving biblical peace, and the privatization of faith takes individualism even further. Many speak of a “personal relationship with Jesus,” meaning one’s own “private” relationship.

Perhaps this explains why so many “self-professed Christians believe they can be perfectly good Christians apart from the church” (92).

Compartmentalizing life, defending personal rights, and sanctioning violence are a few of the ways peace is attacked.

Incorporating baptism, encouraging, edifying, admonishing, and forgiving one another are a few ways to support biblical peace.