Tag: Change

Teach, Encourage, Admonish, Equip

Jesus taught, encouraged, admonished, and equipped twelve men to go and make disciples.

Think about how Jesus individualized each word.

Teach: People will only do what they are taught to do, and our teaching must include application. When provided, everyone learns how to fulfill the task.

Encourage:
Encouraging others motivates them to work harder than before. When criticism is tempered with encouragement, people change.

Admonish: Warning, advising, or even reprimanding others is needed to prevent harm. The attitude behind admonition determines the reception.

Equip: Providing tools to fulfill each task and responsibility are vital to the success of followers, especially as we prepare them to lead.

Choices, Chances, Changes

What kind of change is needed for our leadership to thrive?

Zig Ziglar refers to the 3 C’s of life: “Choices, Chances, Changes. You must make a choice to take a chance or your life will never change.”

Leadership factors into every area of life. How will we use our influence to help others?

Leading others to reach their potential ceases to exist when protecting ourselves is all that matters.

However, we can choose to take a chance. When this paradigm shift occurs, the focus is on a values-based leadership that invests in what is best for others, developing them to reach their potential.

Change

For most, change can be an ugly word and, if done improperly, it is destructive.

Not all change is good, but not all change is bad either.

Change is essential in our relationship with God.

Change begins in the mind. Without explaining why the change is needed, attempts to bring change are futile.

A change of mind is followed by a change of action. Once we understand why we need to change, our actions should reflect the benefit of such knowledge.

Jack Welch said, “If the rate of change inside an organization is less than the rate of change outside the organization…their end is in sight.” Think about it.

Never Give Up

When we give up…

We lose the edge of our character and get discouraged.
We will wonder what could have happened “if” we had endured.
Someone else will lead, and their leadership may not be the right direction.
The opportunity to bring lasting change is delayed, if not eliminated.

The bottom line is – Satan wins!

Leadership has never been an easy road to walk. There are always problems to deal with and opposition to overcome.

However, we must not allow those obstacles and challenges to cause us to give up.

A little twist on an old adage may prove helpful, leaders never quit and quitters never lead.

Until Death

It is significant to notice the reward stated by Jesus given to those who hold true to their dedication and commitment.

In several areas of life, even leadership, when difficulties arise, change, distractions, interruptions, or a failure to measure up to our expectations, our culture looks for the bail out.

Consider the difference that could be made if we all honored our commitments.

Can we imagine the lives we could change by having hearts with such dedication?

There is much to be said for men and women who build on a foundation defined by these two words…until death!

Keep Others Informed

When leaders do not keep others informed, the following happens:

People grow suspicious.
Distrust blossoms.
Doubt develops in leadership ability.
Stress fuels worry.
Anxiety leads to fear.

The lack of communication is not always intentional. Sometimes, we grow into a structured life. We develop a routine and life becomes monotonous. In the end, our communication is often affected.

Is it possible to prevent these concerns from developing and growing? Yes!

Following these three simple words…Keep others informed.

What kind of information needs to be provided? Inform others about…

Plans for the future.
Changes that need to be made.
Challenges / or hindrances facing the plans.
Any and all needs.

Courageous Leaders

How will our influence be remembered in the church and community where we live and serve?

Will we be remembered because of the change we made for the better?

Will our leadership have an impact for the eternal good of others?

Harry Truman once said, ”Men make history and not the other way around. In periods where there is no leadership, society stands still. Progress occurs when courageous, skillful leaders seize the opportunity to change things for the better.”

If it seems as though the world stands still around us, then maybe it is time we stood up to lead. Seize the opportunity to change things for the better.

A Sense of Urgency

John Kotter’s book, Leading Change, describes eight steps to ultimately anchor change within organizational culture.

The first step is to “establish a sense of urgency.” Without it, the possibility of change diminishes.

Often times, awareness of a problem or crises does not go unnoticed, but an overwhelming problem of complacency prevents action producing correction.

The church faces a leadership crisis. We find that some deny the reality of the situation, while others tend to ignore it altogether.

Who will lead from the next generation? What plans are in place to train future leaders for the church?

Unless we realize the urgency of the situation, nothing changes and the result will leave the church without leaders.

Planning Changes

Once we recognize both the high and low points of leadership development, we can strategically plan to build on that foundation and improve our leadership.

Once we acknowledge the area we would change, we can now plan to make that change as we move forward.

Once we consider the individual(s) we could invest our time in, we can develop a mentoring plan that allows us to give the most valuable gift – ourselves.

Once we know where we were, where we are, and where we want to be, everything we plan involves the changes necessary to achieve our goals.

Enthusiastic Leadership

How we approach life comes down to a choice. No one knows how long they have left on this earth.

Doesn’t it make sense that we choose to live each moment to the fullest God intended.

Roald Dahl said, “I began to realize how important it was to be an enthusiast in life. If you are interested in something, no matter what it is, go at it full speed. Embrace it with both arms, hug it, love it and above all become passionate about it. Lukewarm is no good.”

Leaders must demonstrate the choice to live enthusiastically. It is contagious and it changes all who follow.