Tag: Credibility

Transparency

Terry Starbucker’s e-book Leadership From A Glass Half-Full: The 5 Lessons You Need To Learn Before You Jump Into The Pool talks about the seven most important words in leadership.

The phrase is simply, “I don’t know and I’ll find out.”

The reality is we do not like not knowing the answer.

Worse still is the attempt to bluff our way through areas we know nothing about.

The transparency of acknowledging we do not know something and the willingness to find the answer is critical to great leadership.

We gain greater credibility and trust is established when we are are honest.

Learn and live by these seven words.

Practice the Pause

Lori Deschene once said, ”Practice the pause. Pause before judging. Pause before assuming. Pause before accusing. Pause whenever you’re about to react harshly and you’ll avoid doing and saying things you’ll later regret.”

How often do we fail to think before we speak, only to wish later we could take back our words?

From a leadership perspective, learning to practice the pause makes all the difference. When we stop to think and gather all the information possible before speaking or deciding, we can see more clearly the best direction for both.

The result leads to better decisions, which strengthens credibility in our leadership.

Confidence and Credibility

Solomon expressed how the end is better than the beginning.

The thought expressed indicates the satisfaction and joy that accompanies the achievement of a goal. His statement also indicates confidence and credibility.

Reaching the end of the matter strengthens confidence in the leader. As each victory is achieved, leaders grow with confidence for setting out to accomplish the next goal.

When leaders reach the end of the matter, it is an indicator of success, and success breeds credibility for those who follow.

When we enjoy success at the end of the matter, it builds confidence which strengthens our credibility.

Character

Character is the very substance of leadership. Where there is character, there will always be leadership. John Maxwell claims, “Talent is a gift, but character is a choice.”

Why is it so significant to examine areas regarding leadership character?

As leaders, character is indicated by the actions created from the choices we make. I find it interesting that our choices determine our character and, at the same time, our character determines our choices.

How should character be defined? How does character define our leadership? What happens when our character is flawed or seen as no longer credible?

Think on it.

Words to Live By

While reading through a few leadership websites, I found an interesting thought by Terry Starbucker, “The Seven Most Important Words In Leadership.”

The seven words are “I don’t know and I’ll find out.”

Leaders avoid the appearance of not knowing an answer. After all, leaders are supposed to know all the answers, right?

The transparency of acknowledging we do not know and the willingness to find the answer is critical.

First, people know we do not have all the information. Second, greater credibility and trust are established when we are honest with others.

Learn these seven words and live by them.

Decisive Leadership

There are two key elements to being decisive we need to develop.

The first is the idea of sound decisions. The soundness of a decision is going to be subjective based on the moral compass of the individual. From a spiritual leadership perspective, the soundness of one’s decisions will be based on a Biblical compass.

The second involves the word timely. We have all heard, and perhaps experienced, the idea of “timing is everything.” With much prayer, spiritual leaders will seek to make decisions in keeping with God’s timing.

When we make decisions that are both sound and timely, our leadership develops greater credibility.

Qualifying Results

A consequence, effect, or outcome generally defines results. When application is made of specific principles or designs, results are expected. We expect to receive something for the effort generated.

Nothing seems more important to the credibility of leadership than their results. People want to know that a leader has a proven track record of getting results.

However, danger exists when quantity becomes the defining characteristic for results, because how do we quantify faithfulness, spiritual growth, or leadership development? Are these results not as significant as the others?

When leaders learn how to qualify results in ways that help generate enthusiasm for followers, the results will far exceed expectations.

Perceptive Leaders

Leaders are aware how important perception is to their leadership. The perception of followers concerning the words and activities of leaders is vital to the credibility and confidence placed in leadership.

The idea extends to a leader’s insight of individuals, situations, and plans.

Consider the impact of a perceptive leader that has and shows good judgment. Their discernment is exemplified as credible and perceptive.

A perceptive leader is valuable in any organization and this is certainly true when applying scripture to the development of the church and our lives as Christians.

Leading With Proficiency

Numerous qualities are needed to lead others. Nothing strikes more true to the core of leadership than the need for proficiency. A lack of proficiency leads to a loss of credibility, which destroys leadership influence.

Leaders must be skillful, competent, accomplished, and adept. Proficiency can be learned, but it involves time and requires hard work. Mastering proficiency is worth the effort

Leaders must demonstrate an ability to do what is needed and achieve a quality level of performance that can only be described as proficient.

When leaders are characterized in this way, they are capable and efficient.

The Process of Leading

The difficulty that arises in leadership is often connected to learning how to work through any process in order to reach the desired end.

Sadly, learning the process is where the problems begin to surface. The process of one activity or location may not be the same process in another.

The protocol changes depending on the people, culture, and model established.

When we are able to determine the process and work within it, we develop a greater measure of credibility and gain the kind of influence that assists us in becoming the people God intends.