Tag: Credibility

Perceptive Leaders

Leaders are aware how important perception is to their leadership. The perception of followers concerning the words and activities of leaders is vital to the credibility and confidence placed in leadership.

The idea extends to a leader’s insight of individuals, situations, and plans.

Consider the impact of a perceptive leader that has and shows good judgment. Their discernment is exemplified as credible and perceptive.

A perceptive leader is valuable in any organization and this is certainly true when applying scripture to the development of the church and our lives as Christians.

Leading With Proficiency

Numerous qualities are needed to lead others. Nothing strikes more true to the core of leadership than the need for proficiency. A lack of proficiency leads to a loss of credibility, which destroys leadership influence.

Leaders must be skillful, competent, accomplished, and adept. Proficiency can be learned, but it involves time and requires hard work. Mastering proficiency is worth the effort

Leaders must demonstrate an ability to do what is needed and achieve a quality level of performance that can only be described as proficient.

When leaders are characterized in this way, they are capable and efficient.

The Process of Leading

The difficulty that arises in leadership is often connected to learning how to work through any process in order to reach the desired end.

Sadly, learning the process is where the problems begin to surface. The process of one activity or location may not be the same process in another.

The protocol changes depending on the people, culture, and model established.

When we are able to determine the process and work within it, we develop a greater measure of credibility and gain the kind of influence that assists us in becoming the people God intends.

Alienation

When someone is isolated from a group they belong to, we tend to identify it as alienation.

Leaders have an opportunity to influence others for the Lord, for the betterment of life, and growth in the kingdom.

When we are driven to prove a point or advance our agenda, we can alienate those we try to influence, and we lose credibility.

When we lose our credibility and influence, two things happen: 1) a wall of defense is erected, and 2) we drive the other person deeper into their convictions.

The cause of Christ is too great to alienate someone from the greater good.

Timely Advice

Measure twice, cut once.

The lesson behind this advice extends beyond the field of carpentry and medicine. In fact, the application is fitting for most areas of life, especially leadership.

Leadership credibility increases when decisions are based on additional information gained or counsel received indicating the time taken to measure twice.

How different will outcomes be if we take time to investigate before making decisions that compromise our relationship with God and His people?

Measuring twice makes it possible to insure accuracy before making decisions that carry great consequential impact.

Our leadership rests in the balance of this advice.

The End of a Matter…

Solomon said the end is better than the beginning.

From a leadership standpoint, we learn the value of credibility and confidence.

When leaders reach the end of a matter it is an indicator of success, and success breeds credibility for those who follow.

As well, reaching the end of a matter strengthens confidence in the leader. As victory is achieved, leaders grow with confidence to accomplish more.

Our leadership is no different. As leaders achieve success, they anticipate the next challenge or goal and work with tireless effort to build upon their confidence to strengthen their credibility.

Trust…

Good leadership requires trust. In his book Canoeing the Mountains, Tod Bolsinger writes, “No one is going to follow you off the map unless they trust you on it.”

Introducing change challenges any leader to their core. The resistance to change discourages leaders, yet it is inevitable.

While not absolute, often times the problem exists because leaders have not gained trust while leading on the map in order to have people follow them off the map.

Trust is built over time and leaders do not gain trust simply because they have a title or position. When they demonstrate credibility and competence, trust grows.

The Substance of Leadership…

Substance involves a quality of being important, valid, or significant. Simply stated, substance is the stuff that makes up leadership.

What makes up the substance of our leadership? Integrity? Work ethic? Core values?

What stands out that gives credibility to the substance of our leadership?

Only you and I can answer these questions. The substance of spiritual leadership must not be self-centered, but others-centered. The quality that validates the importance of leadership is not built upon “I,” but “you.” The substance of good leadership uses “we.”

As important and needed as leadership is today, it is worth our time to focus on the substance.

Seven Most Important Words…

Terry Starbucker claims the seven most important words are, “I don’t know and I’ll find out.”

As leaders, we do not like not knowing the answer. Leaders are supposed to know all the answers. Right?

We tend to convince ourselves we can bluff our way through any discussion. Wrong!

The transparency of acknowledging when we do not know something and the willingness to find the answer is critical to great leadership. 

Credibility and trust are established when we are are honest with others. Others know we do not have all the information and they know when we are bluffing.

Learn these seven words and live by them.

Leadership Word Of The Week…Persnickety

If there has ever been any wonder to the validity of this word, confirmation exists today. According to the dictionary, the meaning of persnickety has powerful implications for leadership.

Two definitions characterize this week’s word. The first involves too much emphasis on trivial and minor details. The second requires a particularly precise or careful approach. Both ideas relate to areas concerning leadership.

Leadership can be hindered when mountains are made out of mole hills, when we major in the minors and minor in the majors. While trivial and minor details are a part of the overall picture, they must not be the priority and emphasis. These details can create a greater distraction from the need.

Our leadership, however, expands when utilizing a precise and careful approach. An approach to goal-setting, planning, decision-making, and task implementation with precision and watchfulness, establishes credibility in our adeptness to lead. Imagine the difference such an approach makes.

Based on the ideas expressed, adding a little “persnickety” to our leadership lends itself to developing a stronger approach when leading others.