Tag: Example

Accountable

Leaders are accountable, but what exactly does this word involve for spiritual leadership?

There is the implication of what is required. As spiritual leaders, we are required to be trustworthy, faithful, examples, and people of integrity.

There are certain expectations. People tend to meet whatever is expected of them. When leaders make decisions, there is an expectation they will be held accountable.

There is an understanding of responsibility. There is a level of responsibility connected to the decisions and actions taken by leadership.

Leaders will answer to God for the direction of their leadership of God’s people.

Bravery

To be brave is connected to showing courage. Bravery is an action taken at the moment it is needed.

Most who claim to be brave fail to demonstrate what is needed when the moment arises. Sadly, it seems to be easier for people today to move on rather than act bravely. The church needs leaders who recognize the need of this moment and act bravely.

When we look at Jesus, we see the greatest act of bravery in history.

Leaders must follow His example and humbly submit to the will of the Father, giving themselves in service to the kingdom.

Change in Leadership

The general mindset of leadership is about changing others. After all, spiritually speaking, we are leading, right? The purpose of our leadership is changing others, right? Are we not supposed to change others?

However, before we can change others we must first change ourselves. It is easy to ask others to do what we are either unwilling to do or have not done yet.

The power of change, however, begins with us. When we make changes in our own lives first, then we are setting an example for others to see why they should change also.

When leaders provide the example, then consistency is the model.

Leading by Example

The idea of setting an example for others is nothing new. Nestled in this principle is an understanding of influence. We influence people everyday. Some we influence for what is right and some for wrong. The difference is based in our example.

Setting an example is connected to consistency. Mahatma Ghandi is noted as saying we must become the change we want to see.

Setting an example is also associated with servanthood. The only time Jesus gave an example He said to follow was related to being a servant.

To be the leaders God needs today, we need to understand the significance identified with setting the example.

Project Leadership

As a noun, a project is an individual or collaborative enterprise carefully planned and designed to achieve a particular aim.

As a verb, it is described as estimating or forecasting something on the basis of present trends, the force of moving something forward or outward.

As an enterprise that must be carefully planned and designed, leaders need to give serious thought to the project if they hope to achieve the aim.

As an activity, leaders must be the force that influences others in a way that moves them forward and outward.

Leaders who provide this kind of influence will always provide an example worth following.

The Light of Leadership

Jesus claimed to be the “Light of the world.” He further told His disciples, “You are the light of the world…,” concluding the thought by saying, “Let your light shine…”

There can be no doubt that Jesus planned for His followers to reflect His character, virtue, and example in a world that does not welcome the light and often attempts to extinguish it.

Katelyn Irons challenged us with this thought, “Shine with all you have. When someone tries to blow you out, just take their oxygen and burn brighter.”

For leaders, it’s about leading out of being. The light is who we are, not just what we do.

An Example To Follow

Always set an example others can emulate. How do we want others to behave at work, home, or in the church? We must model that behavior first.

The idea of expecting others to behave in ways we are unwilling to do ourselves is the greatest form of hypocrisy and a one-way ticket to losing credibility. Our conduct is all inclusive. We should never compartmentalize our lives into the way we behave on the job, at home, in the neighborhood, and around Christians. A disciple of Christ always lives a Christlike life 24-7-365.

Let us all resolve to provide an example worthy of others to follow.

Leading By Example

Leaders are characterized by their example, and we all set an example by our words and actions.

Paul identified five areas where Timothy was to provide an example as someone who believed: speech, conduct, love, faith, and purity (1 Tim. 4:12).

As parents, children, siblings, employees, and in all other relationships we might consider, our lives should reflect the example set by our Lord.

Notice the results of a good example: 1) we please the Lord, 2) we ensure salvation for ourselves and those who hear us, 3) others know the direction to follow, and 4) our relationships grow stronger.

The Craft of Leadership

Is leadership really a craft? How do leaders hone the craft of leadership? What skills are needed for this craft?

The answers to these questions are varied and complex, depending on the source. There are, however, a few ideas that benefit this approach in leadership.

We all possess certain skills, and developing those skills improves the craft.

Leaders spend years developing and providing a great example to emulate.

Practicing our skills is crucial to understanding the craft and improving our skill set in leadership.

Nothing comes quickly or easily, but with time and effort, our leadership craft matures into something beautiful.

Lead Like Jesus

Peter clearly points out that Jesus suffered, leaving an example to follow in His steps.

Peter’s first letter is one that acknowledges the need for Christians to prepare for suffering, not to be surprised when suffering occurs, and to know that when they suffer as Christians they are blessed.

Would we think differently about the words of the song, “Oh To Be Like Thee,” if we knew that we were asking to suffer as Jesus suffered?

We often hear, “Lead like Jesus.” Will our leadership involve suffering for the cause of the Lord? Are we willing to lead like Him?