Tag: Love

Power of Love…

While we often hear that love makes the world go round, I appreciate a saying by Franklin P. Jones, “Love doesn’t make the world go round. Love is what makes the ride worthwhile.”

Love is the perfect bond of unity.

Love is the greatest among faith, hope and love.

Loving your neighbor as yourself fulfills the royal law.

Perfect love casts out fear.

Love covers a multitude of sins.

Above all, love is demonstrated toward God, then family, friends, brothers and sisters in Christ, and even our enemies.

When love is the foundation, formation, and finishing of our words and actions, godly leadership is exemplified.

Something Greater…

Improving others is one of the greatest keys to successful leadership. Jim Rohn says, “A good objective of leadership is to help those who are doing poorly to do well and to help those who are doing well to do even better.”

The task before leaders involves developing others into something greater. It’s the idea of genuine love.

When leaders care for and demonstrate love for others, they will always work to serve, placing the needs and desires of others above their own.

Hopefully, along the way, we will encourage the fainthearted, strengthen the mature, and allow both to fulfill what God desires.

The Responsibility of Service…

Jose Marti said, “Talent is a gift that brings with it an obligation to serve the world, and not ourselves, for it is not of our making.”

We all have opportunities to develop our abilities. Through education or experience, we can develop natural gifts and use our talent to serve others.

To use our talent only for ourselves is narcissistic. Do we realize that our talent is not of our making?

Our responsibility is fulfilled by serving others.

Godly leaders illustrate the most significant form of biblical love when they demonstrate this service.

Joy…

Joy exceeds simple pleasure. Kenneson claims joy is the byproduct of our desire for something more outward.

The other-directedness nature of joy shows why it is so closely connected to love. If love be related to God’s grace, the gift exemplifies a significance between these two Greek words: charis (grace) and chara (joy).

Scripture connects suffering with joy, and “living joyfully despite persecution and affliction does not require one to deny the reality of suffering or pain” (63).

We cultivate joy when we rejoice in the opportunity to worship God, nurture contentment, and learn to enjoy children.

This is only the beginning.

Love…

Cultivating love is one of the greatest challenges to our Christian walk and leadership.

Considering the loose way we use love is borderline blasphemous. Kenneson says, “…some may justifiably doubt whether a word that can be applied with ease to both God and pizza can illuminate the character of the Christian life” (37).

Love is unmerited, steadfast, suffering, and knows no bounds. God’s very essence is love.

Consider the “other-directedness” nature of God’s love toward you and me in the death of Jesus.

In an environment based on self-interest, one that puts a price on everything (and everyone), cultivating love will require our devotion to building relationships.

The Love to Lead…

Love has multiple meanings. Mostly, love is associated with feelings. When couples first marry, the feelings experienced are associated with their idea of love. Sadly, when those feelings change they begin to think they no longer love the other person.

Biblically, love is intentional, seeking the highest good for the other person. When leaders are self-directed, it is generally because of selfish motives. Again, this is not love.

Love gives without expecting to receive something in return.
Love seeks opportunity to serve in all situations.
Love desires the best for others, even at the cost of personal comfort.

Let us always lead out of love and know the power it brings to leadership.

Observant Leaders…

Consider the power of observation.

Alert: When leaders are alert they quickly notice anything unusual or potentially dangerous. The spiritual battle requires alert leaders.

Watchful: Followers need leaders who are carefully watch over the lives entrusted to their care. Observant leaders are watchful. 

Aware: Leaders demonstrate awareness when they possess knowledge or perception of a situation or fact.

Attentive: Leaders must observe every detail.

Other ideas could be used, but the basis for success is found in being observant. Observant leadership is not easy. It requires diligence, time, patience, and great love.

Leading by Love…

Leaders must exercise caution when it comes to their influence when leading others.

When our conversations focus on “me, myself, and I,” we need to evaluate who we promote.

Spiritual leadership turns its attention to the good of others, even at the expense of self.

Jesus taught about the powerful nature of love. The lesson is that all people will know we are His disciples when we have love for one another. If our words and actions promote self, then we teach a different lesson.

Leadership may be challenged by this battle, but love wins every time.

Destructive Nature of Procrastination…

Perhaps you’ve heard the statement, “The best time to plant a tree is 20 years ago. The second best time is now.” A dear friend, Paul Myers, shared this thought with me about 10 years ago.

Procrastination can be destructive to leadership. Why?

Because there is no better time than now when it comes to…

Leading others to Christ.
Telling someone you love them.
Helping someone mature spiritually.
Strengthening the weak.
Improving ourselves as leaders.

We must fight the desire to procrastinate and use the present to achieve greatness.

Lead in Love…

An old Swedish Proverb says, “Love me when I least deserve it, because that’s when I really need it.”

Applying this thought challenges us on several levels. When we love and receive nothing in return, we feel unappreciated, helpless, and rejected.

In those moments we should remember how God feels when He loves and receives nothing in return. 

Leaders need to know that when we love those who least deserve it, two things happen: 1) We demonstrate a God-like spirit, and 2) We help those who really need to understand the nature of God’s love.

The effort is worth it when we consider the outcome. Lead in love!