Tag: Love

Virtuous Leaders

N.T. Wright’s book, subtitled Why Christian Character Matters, focuses on the need for virtue becoming “second nature.” Virtue must be a natural or automatic response for leaders.

The book develops three major thoughts. The first examines the virtuous purpose of Christian character.

The second discusses the need for character transformation. Character transformation must occur within, creating a change of actions demonstrated in our conduct.

The third considers the virtues of faith, hope, and love. These virtues are developed within the context of community.

We must implement these virtues, but we need each other to do so. We cannot develop as spiritual leaders in isolation.

Leading With Love

One of the greatest needs in our world and yet so challenging involves love.

God loves us for who we are and where we are, unconditionally. Unconditionally is where the difficulty begins.

Paul told the church in Rome that God “demonstrates His love toward us.” The love God demonstrated in the past benefits us now and there is no assessment of it ever ending.

To lead others to the love of God, we must demonstrate the nature of God’s love to them.

We even love those who are not always easy to love. If God continues to love us in this way, we must do the same toward others.

John…Part 1

The apostle John provides great lessons in leadership.

Love:
John is commonly known as the apostle of love. His writings emphasize love, both a brotherly love and the self-sacrificing love of God.

Bold: John’s writings were also bold. To claim we know God and not keep His commandments makes us a liar (1 Jn. 2:4). To say we love God and hate our brother makes us a liar (1 Jn. 4:20).

John loved his brethren enough to help them see the need for a right relationship with God and one another.

Our leadership should exemplify the same.

A Leader’s Golden Rule

Several variations of the “Golden Rule” are commonly known. It might be “do unto others as they have done unto you,” or “do unto others before they do unto you.”

However, Jesus said “do unto others as you would have them do unto you.”

How do we want to be treated as a leader? With respect, understanding, love, appreciation, patience, etc.? If this is how we want to be treated, Jesus would tell us to treat others this way first!

If we are not careful, it is easy to react, instead of acting as we should. We must also be careful to guard against overreacting.

Servant Leaders

Leadership is not a located idea. Leadership is universal in application and is not limited to race, gender, age, or position.

Anyone can lead from anywhere.

We must continually learn from others about leadership. When we learn about the sacrifice, dedication, passion, and attitude of true servant leaders, we should be encouraged to do the same.

They give their lives to prepare others.
They dedicate their time to the work.
They love their people.
They work to serve, not to be served.

The example provided by them demonstrates the character needed for those who learn from them.

Encouraging Words

We cannot measure the impact of an encouraging word spoken at the right time. Yet, we can see the fruit born in the lives of those who receive it.

People need hope. They want to know they can overcome the obstacles encountered on this journey through life.

People want to know they are loved. Communicating in a language they understand takes many forms, but one that always carries weight is a word of encouragement.

Take a moment each day to write a note, make a call, or stop and speak to someone who can use a little encouragement and watch the difference it makes.

Courageous Leadership

Leaders need courage, but what does that mean?

We often think of courage as a quality or characteristic that people possess or develop. Some people have it and some do not.

However, courage is a decision to act bravely when you are scared to death. It is easy to say we have courage when everything operates smoothly, but what about in times of challenge, controversy, or conflict?

It takes courage to stand against the influences of false teaching, to address disciplinary matters, to stand for right decisions (even if unpopular or unaccepted by some), and do so with a gentleness and love that demonstrates concern for every individual.

Love to Lead

I used to tell my children that if you don’t love what you are doing, then do something else. Life is too short to do something you don’t love.

Then, I found a quote from Al Lopez, ”Do what you love to do and give it your very best. Whether it’s business or baseball, or the theater, or any field. If you don’t love what you’re doing and you can’t give it your best, get out of it. Life is too short.”

How true! We face a crossroads between our talent and what we love to do. When we combine them, we find a beautiful combination of success.

Live, Love, and Laugh

Live well – The application holds merit physically and spiritually. How well are we living? Are we simply living for the moment or living well with eternity in view?

Love much – Leadership will only succeed when those we are leading know we love them. Our desire for their highest good will be seen in our words and actions. It takes much love.

Laugh often – A good sense of humor is a vital characteristic for leaders. It is easy to get wrapped up in the struggles of daily life and forget the importance of laughter.

With these three expressions, we find greater influence in our leadership.

Leadership Compass

A compass is an instrument containing a magnetized pointer that shows the direction of magnetic north and bearings from it.

A number of other ideas are also associated with a compass: a moral compass, intellectual compass, spiritual compass, and the list goes on.

Leaders need a compass. There are elements of a moral, emotional, intellectual, economic, and spiritual nature that factor into our leadership.

Remember that, attacking someone’s character only damages our own, even if we are unaware of it. Speaking against others does not build our own esteem, but demeans it.

Pointing people to Christ is never accomplished by destroying them, but rather approaching them in biblical love.