Tag: Relationships

The Right Questions…

One of the critical concerns for leadership development is asking the right questions. In Primal Leadership, Learning To Lead With Emotional Intelligence, the authors examine five discoveries needed to make an emotionally intelligent leader. These discoveries are based on asking the right questions.

Who do we want to be as a leader?
Who are we? Strengths and weaknesses
Do we work on developing who we want to be or what someone else wants us to be?
Are we willing to form new habits of practice? 
What emphasis are we placing upon developing relationships?

Answering these five questions points us in the right direction.

Relational Leadership…

“Leaders aren’t built in a day––they’re built over a season. Leadership development is not a class you take––it’s an intentional relationship you build.” Mac Lake

Leaders know that leadership is about people. Without building relationships with others, the work of leading is arduous.

This thought is even more crucial when we consider the necessity of developing others to lead. When leaders intentionally focus on relationships with future leaders, these leaders blossom and secure the future of the church.

The time invested makes a difference for every aspect of leadership development.

Relationship-Building Conduct…

“Time decides who you meet in life, your heart decides who you want in your life, and your behavior decides who stays in your life.” Unknown

For our purpose in today’s post, let’s focus on the last phrase.

People come and go for many reasons, job transfers, family matters, economic changes, and a host of circumstances.

Have we ever considered the impact of our conduct on those who stay or leave?

Our conduct has the power to create a bond that no distance can separate.

The choice is ours. When our conduct is Christlike, relationships develop a bond that keep people in our lives.

Successful Leadership…

Success has been defined in numerous ways, but how we define and measure success is critical to leadership.

Here are a few suggestions to consider.

1) Setting smart goals and developing solid plans to achieve them

2) Growing spiritually stronger in relationship to God and others

3) Utilizing God’s word as the standard for decisions

4) Providing the right tools to assist others reach their potential

Ultimately, changed lives are the true measure of success. We could say so much more, but the point is the same. As spiritual leaders, we must define and measure success by the lives changed within our sphere of influence.

Do We Make People Better?

“Be the one who nurtures and builds. Be the one who has an understanding and a forgiving heart one who looks for the best in people. Leave people better than you found them.” Marvin J. Ashton

One of the most endearing and powerful qualities of good leaders, and Christians in general, is the ability to make the lives of others better.

Our world is one that promotes more self-centeredness than anything else. The concept and practice of seeking the best in other people and putting their needs above our own is rare. Yet, this is exactly what God did in sending His only Son to die on our behalf.

We do well to follow the example in our relationships with others.

One of the most important lessons from years past is that when something is borrowed, always return it better than you received it. What a great idea for our relationships with others. God entrusted us with the lives of people around us and nothing more enduring can be done than to make their lives better than we found them. This is great leadership!