Tag: Responsibility

Advocate

When people struggle with their faith, do they know they have an advocate?
When people face the challenges of daily life, are we there as an advocate?
When others step up to accept responsibility, will we be an advocate for them?

Everyone needs someone who walks by their side as a champion for them. Whether it is during a time of temptation, personal trial, or spiritual growth, leaders must be an advocate for those who follow.

The necessity of such is vital to the development of the Lord’s church. We all need to know our Advocate, Jesus, and followers need to know the advocate they have in leadership.

Developing Leaders

If there was one word leaders need to understand for the success of the church, it would be develop.

The goal of teaching was to present every person mature in Christ. God gave gifts to various individuals for the purposing of helping the church develop, achieving unity and maturity in the faith.

Developing faith and relationship with God is the vital responsibility of leadership.

We must lead others to a greater love and understanding of His word.
We must assist Christians in using their God given abilities in His service.
We must encourage the expression of God’s grace toward others.

Leadership is about development. Let’s get started.

Responsibility in Leadership

Leadership involves responsibility. The higher one goes in leadership, the greater the responsibility.

We could also say we live in a culture where the common practice is one of blaming others. The problem is not cultural. This practice has been in place since the creation of humanity. We have not changed much as people in the twenty-first century.

Leadership seeks and takes responsibility for their actions.

Leaders give credit to the team in victory, but take full responsibility in defeat.

Rarely do we find such integrity and leadership. Yet, when leaders seek and take responsibility for their actions their influence grows.

Proficient

Leaders must be technically proficient. There are two primary areas where this principle has direct application.

First, leaders need to know their job. They need to know what they are supposed to be doing. When they do not, the result is disastrous for the overall production of the group and task.

Second, leaders need to be familiar with the job responsibilities of others. Unless leaders know the job responsibilities of others and provide accountability for the work, progress becomes dependent on leadership to carry on the work.

From a spiritual perspective, when leaders are no proficient we find sheep without a shepherd.

Benefits of Failure

What or who determines failure? Why is failure seen as negative? How can leaders learn and improve their leadership?

Recognize failure is inevitable. No matter who you are failure takes place.

Acknowledge and take responsibility. Do not ignore, deny, or cast blame when failure occurs.

Remember the words of Winston Churchill, “Success is not final, failure is not fatal: it is the courage to continue that counts.”

Do not hesitate to act. Waiting to act creates a perception of apathy.

Learn from failure and make changes to prevent the same mistakes.

Work to build a series of successful events or programs to reassure the strength of the leadership.

Investing in Relationships

Life can be discouraging when others take us for granted. Perhaps we can relate to how others feel when we take them for granted.

This happens in families, at school, on the job, around our neighborhoods, and hundreds of other places each day.

Whether we are taken for granted, or we take others for granted, as leaders we have a responsibility.

Without investing in these relationships, we lose the opportunity to influence others in ways that lead to lasting friendships and eternal rewards.

We cannot change others, but we can look at ourselves and address the changes needed to eliminate taking others for granted.

Metabolism and Leadership

Metabolism is the chemical process that occurs within a living organism in order to maintain life. If that were not enough, we learn there are two kinds of metabolism: constructive and destructive.

One involves the synthesis of various components that strengthen life and the other breaks it down.

The application is not hard to make. Leaders carry the responsibility of pulling together the processes needed to maintain the life and health of the organization.

Two types of leaders exist in this realm. Constructive leaders synthesize the components needed to strengthen life and destructive leaders constantly look for ways to tear it down.

Which one are you?

Letting God Down

Few people think about what happens when they let someone down.

Sadly, our desire to not let someone down leads us to try and please everyone. Even though we know it is impossible, we still try.

Have we ever considered how our decisions, words, or actions let God down? Spiritual leadership carries some of the greatest responsibility on earth and we never want to let those we lead down. Above all, we never want to let our God down.

If we focus on Him and pursue His will, we may let someone down, but our relationship with God remain secure.

Harmonizing Leadership

From a spiritual perspective, few areas carry greater weight than the ability to work with different people in different situations and pull everything together into a relationship of harmony and effective work.

An obvious challenge to this way of thinking is the stubborn, obstinate, self-driven, self-serving, or arrogant attitudes that are often displayed by those who find their place in trying to destroy good ideas or plans.

Regardless, working with people is going to surface the good and bad in others. Therefore, a leader’s responsibility involves finding ways to work with these individuals and situations in ways to reach the ultimate good of the whole.

Leading with Respect

Regardless of the environment or situation, people want leaders who respect and value how they contribute to the achievement of organizational goals.

Few areas, however, gain respect more quickly than by showing respect to and for others. A couple of suggestions include: 1) attention given to work accomplished, 2) time to build relationships, 3) accepting responsibility and giving accountability, 4) transparency, and 5) trust.

Leaders who strive to gain, earn, and achieve respect lead with heart. They touch the lives of those who follow and change the power of teamwork in the growth of any organization.