Tag: Teaching

Redirecting Our Focus…

We are all molded by the events of the past, whether teaching, experience, or influence. Each of these take on both a positive and negative trait.

Paul’s family heritage, academic credentials, knowledge of scripture, and zealous attack against the church left a mark he did not forget from his past.

However, he did not allow the past to dictate the direction of his future. Paul had a new spiritual focus.

Leaders must learn from the past in order to prevent repeating areas that hinder our Christian influence.

The challenges of yesterday are past. We need to redirect our attention toward a spiritual future.

Compassionate Leaders…

Compassion means “to suffer together,” and no one understood this better than Jesus.

The University of California, Berkley claims that something special exists when compassion characterizes a leader: a feeling of sympathy aroused by another’s suffering and the motivation to relieve the suffering.

The guiding hand of compassion considers the suffering of someone else and acts accordingly.

The compassion of Jesus was represented in several ways. He prayed for them, healed them, fed them, and taught them.

Leaders who follow these guidelines lay a foundation that lasts into eternity.

Educating Leaders…

The basic understanding of leadership involves moving someone from point A to point B.

Jim Rohn said, “If someone is going down the wrong road, he doesn’t need motivation to speed him up. What he needs is education to turn him around.”

A biblical leader helps those who are outside of Christ (point A) turn from a self-directed life to obediently follow the Savior (point B). A key element to this prescriptive help is teaching.

The need is urgent and relevant to every soul we encounter daily.

Precious souls need encouragement to pursue the right course, a course to find eternal hope.

Student Leaders…

As a teacher, many factors determine a successful classroom experience.

We may use visual aids (PowerPoint, whiteboard or handouts). We may incorporate dialogue. 

Whatever we choose, the bottom-line involves learning. Is the student learning the material presented?

The most common mistake is that teachers teach and students learn. This mentality leads to a lecture style of teaching and avoids discussion that might challenge the thinking of the teacher.

As a leader, we must first be a student ourselves. We need to use every opportunity to learn from others.

Each person has knowledge, life experience, and abilities that should make the classroom a place where everyone learns.