Tag: Truth

Honest Leadership

Honesty is critical to leadership, but not all leaders are honest. At times, they tend to tell “half-truths.”

Biblically, we know the necessity of honesty as a Christian virtue. Therefore, the application of honesty in biblical leadership is a natural reflection of what is expected by God and others.

Honesty is characterized in the words of David, describing the the power of biblical leadership in the one who “walks with integrity, and works righteousness, and speaks truth in his heart” (Ps. 15:2).

The emphasis of David provides a platform for leaders, describing both who they are and what they do.

Improving Our Leadership

Leaders must continually strive to improve. Although the author is unknown, the following thought is powerful, “The day you stop getting better is the day you better quit.”

We point to this idea frequently, but it cannot be overstated. We all need to constantly work at improvement.

Leading in the home requires more attention to provide the right foundation.

Leading at work provides direction for the success of the organization.

Leading in the church is essential to uphold truth, save souls, strengthen faith, and sustain generational leadership.

We must pursue, with fervor, the improvement of who we are and what we do as leaders.

A Lonely Place

Leadership can be lonely.

However, the truth about spiritual leadership is that no matter who walks away, God is always there. Paul reminds us that no one can bring a charge against God’s elect, no one can condemn or separate us from the love of Christ. We are not alone!

This truth makes it possible to lead with confidence, grow stronger in faith, overcome any obstacle, and instill hope.

When we understand we are not alone, perhaps we will learn how to meet the needs of others who need to know the same.

Flexible Leadership…

While several leadership qualities were demonstrated by Paul, one is key: flexibility (1 Corinthians 9:19-23).

Notice the driving force of Paul’s flexibility, “So that I might win…by all means save some.” Nothing took greater precedence in his life than leading others to Christ.

There was no compromise to the truth. The “anything goes” approach was unacceptable. At all times he was in submission to Jesus.

Notice the flexibility of personal choice: “I do all things for the sake of the gospel.”

If Christians could model this today, we could change the world.

The Moment of Truth…

One of the greatest challenges leaders face involves an uncompromising conviction of truth.

The moment of truth is not measured by what a leader hopes, desires, or thinks.

The moment of truth is measured by what a leader does, the stand they take, and the demonstration of character when it is unpopular with the majority.

A time comes in the life of every person when they must decide how they are going to act or react to the circumstances surrounding them.

Leaders are needed who hold to and lead by the truth delivered by God to the world, a defining moment of true leadership.

The Essence of Leadership…

Essence is the intrinsic nature or indispensable quality of something––especially something abstract––that determines its character.

The idea raises questions and ideas.

What is the essence of our leadership? Is there any substance to our leadership?

David talks about one “who walks with integrity, works righteousness, and speaks truth in his heart” (Ps. 15:2).

The idea behind walks, works, and speaks describes more than just actions. David is talking about who someone is on the inside.

Godly leaders know that character may be defined by their activities, but ultimately it is who they are on the inside that moves others to follow.

Leading by Faith…

Paul told the church in Corinth, “We walk by faith and not by sight” (2 Co. 5:7). He emphasized the need to live a life guided by God’s word. His word provides direction, motivation, and a secure foundation upon which to stand.

When leadership is guided by God’s word, the results are significant.

There is confidence in knowing the direction is guided by God, Himself.

God’s word provides the greatest purpose for character formation.

Leaders know there is strength when grounded in the truth.

Let us always lead by the faith.

Faithfulness…

Faithfulness is rooted in the very character of God. Reliability, steadfastness, constancy, fidelity, dependability, trustworthiness are all words that describe the qualities of God’s faithfulness.

Amidst the increasing instability of our culture we discover several obstacles to faithfulness.

Nurturing the temporal and disposable elements of life challenge lasting faithfulness. Shunning commitments and focusing our loyalty on improper objects become obstacles to our faithfulness as leaders.

However, we cultivate faithfulness when we celebrate God’s abiding presence, lift Him up in worship, keep our promises, and tell the truth.

Kenneson raises several powerful questions and provides suggestions to the other-directed nature of faithfulness on pages 194-195.

Independence…

Tomorrow, our country celebrates its independence.

There is a beautiful comparison between our physical freedom and the spiritual freedom enjoyed in Christ.

The willing, loving, and gracious sacrifice of Jesus demonstrates the value of our freedom.

The greatest joy of celebrating our independence is to willingly, lovingly, and graciously help others celebrate the same by introducing them to the way, the truth, and the life. 

The abundant life promised by Jesus is one of freedom from the consequences of sin.

Our leadership should always help others understand the price paid for this celebration, physically and spiritually.

A Learning Leader…

The subjects of leadership and learning are interrelated. John F. Kennedy said, “Leadership and learning are indispensable to each other.”

A mindset that exists, often referred to as a leadership myth, is the idea that once someone becomes a leader they having nothing left to learn. Nothing could be further from the truth.

Arrogance is a dangerous attitude to possess. It leads to a lack of gratitude, separation, and a delusional personality. Ultimately, it destroys any possibility of leading from a godly position.

Leaders must constantly learn. They must be, as Wayne Roberts has said, “A student of the Word and of the world.”

Both require one to be a learner.