Tag: Culture

I Surrender All

Paul told Christians in Romans 12 to present their bodies a living and holy sacrifice.

The idea is based on an Old Testament reference to sacrifices. When God’s people brought their sacrifice, it was presented as an offering to the Lord, which meant they surrendered all rights of ownership and any plans for future use.

When leaders understand this concept their perspective changes concerning how they lead God’s people.

If we could grasp the significance of this one practice, the culture of the church would change and our influence in the world would be immeasurable.

May we all present ourselves to the Lord!

Inspiring Leadership

Biblically, we know that God inspired the authors of the Old and New Testaments to write with accuracy the words penned throughout each book and letter.

God did not remove the style, history, or culture of each person. He ensured that what was written was accurate and complete.

Although they are not inspired, leaders today should consider how they can inspire others to reach their potential.

Our son, Chase, once said, “You don’t have to be inspired to be inspiring.” With a little effort, each of us can achieve so much for the cause of our Lord and inspire others along the way.

Life-Changing Leadership

“If you plan for a year, plant a seed;
If for 10 years, plant a tree;
If for a hundred years, teach the people.” unknown

The idea behind this thought leads in the direction of changing, not just the future, but generations to come.

Thinking more long-term requires extensive consideration to the goals and plans that bring about transformation, the kind of transformation that influences our grandchildren’s children.

This is where leaders are needed. The global culture needs leadership to step up and act in ways that will teach people. Here is where life changes!

Admitting Wrong

Our culture is proud. To some degree, this is true in all countries. Perhaps it is human nature. The concept of being wrong is not a pleasant or acceptable situation for most.

We do not want to admit or acknowledge we were wrong. The older we get the more difficult it is to admit.

Marvin Williams tells us, “There is no better test of a man’s integrity than his behavior when he is wrong.”

Rare is the leader who, when faced with the reality of being wrong, has the integrity to admit they were wrong, accept the consequences, learn from it, and correct the situation.

Positive Leadership…

Is it possible in our culture to avoid negativity? No! We cannot completely avoid negativity. Sadly, we are surrounded by it. We often face so much negativity it becomes difficult to see anything positive.

What can we do to limit negativity’s influence?

Why not begin at God’s throne and seek guidance in overcoming the issue.
A good dose of optimism from friends is another place to help.
Limiting social media is a positive direction.
Commit to saying at least five positive things every day.

These few steps will move us in a positive direction.

Reasonable and Rational…

Insanity – “doing the same things in the same way and expecting different results.”

We often practice a level of insanity when approaching leadership, we do the same things the way we have always done them, yet we expect different results.

Culture has changed. Demographics have changed. We have changed.

We need a little sanity. By definition, sanity speaks to reasonable and rational behavior.

The thought involves making sure we investigate all the facts, consider the pros and cons, and implement change with a reasonable and rational approach for what is best.

Sanity or insanity? That is the question.

The Sign of Our Times…

Are leaders able to know the signs of our times? Are they aware of the cultural changes developing daily?

The direction of our world can be frightening and exciting at the same time. The opportunities have never been greater. The needs have never been more pressing.

The message never changes, but the methods we use to approach our current time needs attention. If the methods we use are outdated, the effectiveness is limited.

Can we see the signs of the times, or are we doing the same things in the same ways expecting different results? It deserves thinking about.

Cultural Power…

Culture is a relative term. We do know that culture is a word connected to cultivating, gardening. Culture is defined as the beliefs, customs, arts, etc. of a particular society, group of people, time and place. Culture is also characterized by a way of thinking, belief, or behavior.

Our world is a multi-cultural place, and there are numerous cultures within cultures.

Leaders work to understand the culture, but changing the culture is far from easy, if not impossible.

Jesus seems to follow a good approach with the 1st century culture. How will we lead in the 21st century culture?

Faithfulness…

Faithfulness is rooted in the very character of God. Reliability, steadfastness, constancy, fidelity, dependability, trustworthiness are all words that describe the qualities of God’s faithfulness.

Amidst the increasing instability of our culture we discover several obstacles to faithfulness.

Nurturing the temporal and disposable elements of life challenge lasting faithfulness. Shunning commitments and focusing our loyalty on improper objects become obstacles to our faithfulness as leaders.

However, we cultivate faithfulness when we celebrate God’s abiding presence, lift Him up in worship, keep our promises, and tell the truth.

Kenneson raises several powerful questions and provides suggestions to the other-directed nature of faithfulness on pages 194-195.

Goodness…

Goodness is a fruit to be cultivated in the midst of a self-help culture. Three thoughts introduce the idea of goodness.

One, the consistent testimony in scripture that God alone is unequivocally good.

Two, if sin makes us incapable of goodness apart from God, as those created in His image, we possess the potential for goodness.

Three, knowing what counts for good can only be determined under the guidance of God’s Spirit.

We cultivate goodness by naming our sin, attending to God’s word, and imitation.

When leaders are characterized by goodness, self-awareness, upward attention, and outward activity cultivate this fruit.