Tag: Trust

Familiarity…

Developing familiarity between leaders and followers takes time and a process that involves several key factors.

A mutual respect for life experiences builds a stronger relationship of trust in the common goals and expectations of the group.

When we share life experiences with each other, familiarity grows stronger. It is the biblical teaching of “weep with those who weep and rejoice with those who rejoice.”

An open door policy contributes to the approach-ability of everyone involved. Achieving this task is not easy, but the results bring lasting leadership.

The stronger our familiarity, the stronger our leadership.

Decision Makers…

Leaders must be decisive. When they are indecisive, their leadership is called into question.

What causes indecisiveness? Here are three possibilities.

Fear: fear of making the wrong decision, the unknown, and fear of failure are leading causes.

Trust: leaders who lack trust in their own abilities and the abilities of others are often indecisive.

Procrastination:
this mindset leads to indecision because there is a lack of urgency.

What can be done to help leaders overcome this indecisive tendency?

Gather ALL the facts.
List out the pros and cons.
Pray about it.
Trust your instincts.
Establish a precautionary backup plan.
Then, make the decision.

Dealing Out Hope…

After spending several hours contacting numerous shelters to find housing for someone in need, an overwhelming realization of the hopeless condition among our population was apparent.

A compassionate heart quickly recognizes how people can feel so hopeless. A number of explanations may be given as to the cause, but the need for leaders is to provide hope. Napoleon is credited with saying, “leaders are dealers in hope.”

Leaders extend hope by learning to listen and express concern.

Leaders need to offer hope that someone is trustworthy.

Leaders possess a responsibility to demonstrate care by action.

People follow leaders who provide hope.

A Godly Leader…

The Bible often speaks of being set apart, or holy. David emphatically claimed we should “…know that the Lord has set apart the godly man for Himself; the Lord hears when I call to Him.”

This is such a powerful thought. God has taken action toward the godly for Himself, which highlights a special relationship between God and the godly. The result is followed by activity.

Tremble…and do not sin.
Meditate…and be still.
Offer the sacrifices of righteousness.
Trust in the Lord.

The combination of these four areas provides a powerful foundation for the success of a godly leader.

Fearless Trust…

Throughout many of the Psalms, David writes about his fearless trust in God.

Leaders need a relationship with God that exudes trust in Him to provide everything needed to fulfill His will. How does this develop?

In a word “seeking” Him.

Seek a dwelling in the house of the Lord every day.
Seek to behold the beauty of the Lord.
Seek to meditate in His temple.

If leaders seek these three areas, they develop a greater relationship with God and others.

Stop Picking Up The Slack…

Who picks up the slack when someone fails to fulfill their responsibility? Usually, it is a leader.

When leaders take the responsibility because someone a) does not know how, b) is unwilling, or c) is too lazy to do the work, they create challenges to their leadership.

In order to turn the situation around, consider the following.

1) Evaluate all the details.
2) Learn the art of delegating.
3) Start with smaller responsibilities and increase as faithfulness is demonstrated.
4) Equip others with the proper tools.
5) Trust the job will get done, and reward accordingly.

These few steps help leaders move forward.

A Considerate Leader…

A considerate leader stands out.

They have a heart for others. Leaders are challenged to consider the good intention of others first. We live in a skeptical world. We tend to question the motive or intention of everyone, including those who deserve our greatest trust.

A considerate leader thinks about the needs of others. The needs are hard to recognize when we only experience superficial relationships. Leaders must get below the surface and learn the real need and consider how to provide it.

Consideration should be a part of a leader’s daily walk in relationships. Doing so exemplifies the compassion of great leadership.

Trust…

Good leadership requires trust. In his book Canoeing the Mountains, Tod Bolsinger writes, “No one is going to follow you off the map unless they trust you on it.”

Introducing change challenges any leader to their core. The resistance to change discourages leaders, yet it is inevitable.

While not absolute, often times the problem exists because leaders have not gained trust while leading on the map in order to have people follow them off the map.

Trust is built over time and leaders do not gain trust simply because they have a title or position. When they demonstrate credibility and competence, trust grows.

Testing our Leadership…

Based on experience, most students prefer to skip tests.

However, tests are biblical and spiritual leaders will face them throughout their leadership.

Abraham is an example. God tested Abraham by commanding him to offer his only son, Isaac, as a burnt offering.

The New Testament letter from James speaks about the testing of our faith. The result produces endurance which leads to completeness.

With this in mind, how should leaders respond when tested?

Pray for God’s wisdom and guidance.
Read God’s word and focus on the purpose.
Seek counsel from leaders who have passed tests.
Trust God’s use of tests to make us into His leaders.

Trusting God’s Leadership…

One of the common themes throughout the Psalms encourages God’s people to seek refuge and trust in Him. Notice the thought expressed in Psalm 118, “It is better to take refuge in the Lord than to trust in man.”

When we trust in ourselves, we can easily become frustrated with our lack of abilities.

When we trust in others, we often become disillusioned to the role of humanity.

Overall, leaders must set the example of trust and dependence upon God. We must learn to trust with all our heart and seek refuge in Him, rather than ourselves or others.