Tag: Trust

Trust

Leaders need to demonstrate trust in others.

One of the great challenges in leadership is a micromanaging style of leading. When leaders give someone a task or job to accomplish, there should be a level of trust that allows them to complete the work.

Standing over someone to guide and counsel every detail in their actions or correct each imperfection communicates a lack of trust.

If the individual is not trustworthy, then they should not be given the job. If they are trustworthy, then leaders must demonstrate trust by equipping others with the tools needed for the task and let them go to work.

Leading with Respect

Regardless of the environment or situation, people want leaders who respect and value how they contribute to the achievement of organizational goals.

Few areas, however, gain respect more quickly than by showing respect to and for others. A couple of suggestions include: 1) attention given to work accomplished, 2) time to build relationships, 3) accepting responsibility and giving accountability, 4) transparency, and 5) trust.

Leaders who strive to gain, earn, and achieve respect lead with heart. They touch the lives of those who follow and change the power of teamwork in the growth of any organization.

Developing Leaders

Leaders constantly wrestle with doing work themselves. The tendency is to think that if the job is be done right, we have to do it ourselves.

This mindset will not yield the development of others in leadership.

Consistently, the idea of multiplying or duplicating leaders is critical to the growth and success of any organization.

Jesus went about with the same purpose.

Leaders must allow others to make the same mistakes they made in the beginning and then provide help. Trust the process.

This is crucial if we are to have leaders for the future of the church.

Transparency

Transparency is a vital component to making things happen. A Forbes article identifies what happens when leaders are transparent.

  1. Problems are solved faster.
  2. Teams are built easier.
  3. Relationships grow authentically.
  4. People begin to promote trust in their leader.
  5. Higher levels of performance emerge.

Based on these five areas, transparency enables followers to understand and assist leadership in ways that move an organization forward to greater achievements.

How can leaders become more transparent in their leadership? Start with communication.

The time invested to produce a system of solid communication raises transparency and its benefits.

A Matter of Trust

Can we trust someone simply because they say, “Trust me”?

Scripture is clear about the need for us to trust God and He is worthy of our trust.

Consider the opposite: Can God trust us? Do we have and demonstrate the type of character that is worthy of His trust?

Trust means we are faithful to our promise and we guard what has been entrusted to us.

God entrusted us with His word. If we are trustworthy we will be good students of His word and diligent to make application. When this happens, it makes it easier to share it with others.

Micro-Managing Leaders

We all know leaders who micro-manage every area. They want a hand in every intricate part of the project or activity.

They tend to experience fear if something happens they do not control.

We need to rethink the approach we take in leading others for the sake of our Lord and Savior.

We plant and water, remembering that He is the One who will make it grow. If we can focus on doing our part, He will do His!

The challenge enters when we think we are responsible for God’s part and micro-manage our influence in leading others. Trust God to do His part.

The Speed of Leadership

Life often goes by at “break-neck” speed and we struggle to keep up. Occasionally, a slower pace would be nice.

Life, however, is not always as easily planned as we might like.

Such is true in leadership. There will be days we accelerate the pace to accomplish certain tasks or reach specific goals. Other days move us to slow everything down.

The key is to prioritize what must be done today, be flexible – fast or slow, never hesitate to ask for help when needed, and trust in God’s providence.

It is amazing how and where God is working.

Leadership and Character

I have often discussed the necessity of character when talking about leadership. The primarily quality of a leader’s character is trust.

Leaders must certainly be worthy of the trust placed in them by those who follow.

I appreciate Rory Vaden’s thought, “In easy times, personality is revealed. In hard times, your character is revealed.”

The last year delivered some pretty hard times for leaders in the church. Now, more than ever, the church needs leaders who have the kind of character that is worthy of trust.

Can God trust us to lead in this way?

A Trustworthy Leader…

Can God trust us to love His church, be a good student of His Word, share the gospel with others, make the right choices, and lead His people?

Will others trust us to lead with consistency, competence, and connect with them?

How would we answer these questions?

Paul claimed “…it is required of stewards that one be found trustworthy” (1 Co. 4:2).

As stewards of all God has entrusted to us, are we trustworthy?

Let us develop a character that is worthy of trust, God’s and other’s.

Familiarity…

Developing familiarity between leaders and followers takes time and a process that involves several key factors.

A mutual respect for life experiences builds a stronger relationship of trust in the common goals and expectations of the group.

When we share life experiences with each other, familiarity grows stronger. It is the biblical teaching of “weep with those who weep and rejoice with those who rejoice.”

An open door policy contributes to the approach-ability of everyone involved. Achieving this task is not easy, but the results bring lasting leadership.

The stronger our familiarity, the stronger our leadership.